Department of History and Government

This is an archived copy of the 2015-2016 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.twu.edu.

http://www.twu.edu/history-government/

Chair: Jonathan Olsen, Professor
Location: CFO 605

Phone: 940-898-2133
Fax: 940-898-2130
E-mail: historygov@twu.edu

Graduate Degrees Offered

The Department of History and Government offers two master’s degrees, one in history and one in government. A minor in either history or government is also available to master’s-level graduate students. Students in other graduate departments are welcome to take graduate courses in the department with the consent of the instructor.

The M.A. in government provides a postgraduate study of U.S. and global politics, political processes, and government institutions. In history, the M.A. emphasizes social and political history in the United States, Europe, Latin America, and the Caribbean. The extensive Women’s Collection at the Blagg-Huey Library is an excellent research resource for graduate students. Students are encouraged by the faculty to consider courses from other disciplines outside the department as part of their graduate program. Course selection should be made with the advice and approval of the student’s graduate committee.

The department’s programs include internships in both the public and private sectors and opportunities to participate in oral history projects.

Admission Requirements

Please see the admission's section in this catalog. In addition to these general requirements, the Department of History and Government requires the following for admission to its graduate degree programs:

  1. A student’s record overall clearly should reflect the ability to pursue advanced study, conduct research, and write effectively in the field selected.
  2. Applicants should document a strong preparation in the liberal arts.
  3. The applicant is expected to have at least a 3.25 average in the last 60 semester credit hours of course work and at least 12 semester credit hours of upper-division undergraduate or graduate work in the major field.
  4. Applicants are required to submit a statement of purpose to the department. Two letters of recommendation are required. Applicants who do not meet the above prerequisites at the time of application may, under exceptional circumstances, be recommended for provisional admission by the department.

Minors Offered to Students from Other Departments

Master’s level

All minors must be approved by the student's graduate committee and must include at least 6 graduate semester credit hours in history.

Government Courses

GOV 5003. Comparative Politics. Review of major theoretical models and approaches in the field of comparative politics including group politics, elite analysis, class analysis, structural functional analysis, and systems theory with emphasis upon modernization and political development. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5013. American National Defense Policy. Review of alternative theories of American national defense policy with emphasis upon historical development of current U.S. policy, including nuclear strategies, mutual defense agreements, regional conflicts, guerilla warfare, terrorism, and protection of strategic resources. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5033. Research Methods in Government. Examination of methodology used in Government/Political Science research. Prerequisite: Must be taken in the first 12 hours of graduate study. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5053. The Presidency and Public Policy. Personnel politics and policy process of the executive branch. Advanced reading, research, and group discussion. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5063. Political Women. The participant style, background, perspective, and role of female political elite. Current status of the Constitutional rights of women, women's political issues, and women's pressure groups. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5073. Issues in Constitutional Law. Review and examination of selected issues in U.S. constitutional development including judicial politics, governmental structure, judicial review, separation of powers, federalism, due process, equal protection, and individual liberties. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5093. Law, Gender, and Sexuality. Evolution of legal rights for women and sexual minorities and theoretical issues raised in concrete legal cases. Examination of debates over equality approaches in law; ways in which law constructs gender and sexuality; and the intersecting roles of gender, sexuality, and race in legal doctrine and theory. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5133. Leadership and Women. An examination of the principles and exercise of leadership. Emphasis on women as leaders. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5183. Civil War: Culture, History, and Law. Social, political, and legal context of the War between the States. Analysis of southern secession from the Union, the struggle to restore the Union, and the political and legal struggles of former slaves and their descendants. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5193. Rights, Race, and Social Justice. Interpretations of the utility of constitutional rights in movements for social justice, with special attention to struggles for racial equality. Readings in legal studies, social sciences, critical legal studies, and critical race theory that address the relationship of legal rights and change. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5303. Problems in the Legislative Process. Legislative decision making in selected areas of public policy; appraisals of strengths and weaknesses in the American legislative process. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5413. Civil Rights: Culture, History, and Law. Social, political, and legal concepts of the Civil Rights Movement; historical and legal issues of Jim Crow laws, Plessy vs. Ferguson, and Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court decisions; peaceful protests; forms of social disorder in a quest for equal rights. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5423. Native Americans: Culture, History, and Law. Relations between European settlers and Native American tribes with emphasis on cultural differences, land use, and government-tribe relations. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5473. Vietnam War: Culture, History, and Law. Historical context of American involvement in the Vietnam conflict; political decisions of the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations; impact of the war on political protest and social unrest; courts resolution of related controversies; legacy of the war. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5483. War, National Security, and Civil Liberties. Public policy solutions regarding the balance between maintaining national security and protecting civil liberties; history of the nation's attempts to evaluate security policies from colonial times to current events. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5523. American International Relations. The revolution in American foreign policy in the twentieth century; America's leading role in the world today. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5603. Professional Practices. Professional practices engaged in by individuals with advanced degrees in history and political science; exploration of issues related to teaching, research, and service. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5723. Seminar in Political Theory. A study of contemporary debates concerning fundamental political issues and principles of good government; analysis and discussion of ideas on class, race, sex, power, citizenship, and justice. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5753. Age of Industrialism. Historical, cultural, and legal context for transformation of United States to urbanized, industrial power between 1870 and 1920; impact of railroads, the "Robber Barons," and struggles between organized labor and management. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5833. Seminar in Government. Individual research topics; methodology and bibliography. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5903. Special Topics. Organized course with each section's title and content varying with specific subject matter and topic offered. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5913. Independent Study. Independent study of selected topics in government. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Credit: Three hour.

GOV 5933. Internship. Supervised practical experience, related to the academic and career objectives of the student, in a public or private agency. A paper will be required. May be repeated for a total of six hours. Eight practicum hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5936. Internship. Supervised practical experience, related to the academic and career objectives of the student, in a public or private agency. Sixteen practicum hours a week. Credit: Six hours.

GOV 5973. Professional Paper. The research and writing of a professional paper by each student on a topic selected jointly by the student and the instructor. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5983. Thesis. Credit: Three hours.

GOV 5993. Thesis. Prerequisite: GOV 5983. Credit: Three hours.

History Courses

HIST 5003. Studies in 19th Century U.S. A study of the 19th century with discussion and analysis of various historians' interpretations of the same events. Increased knowledge of the events of this period and the study of how one writes history. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5023. Colonial America in an Atlantic World. A cross-cultural study of colonial America; the varied social, economic, political, and cultural experiences of Africans, Europeans, and Native Americans from 1450 through 1763. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5033. Research Methods in History. Research trends, methods, and theories in historical inquiry. Prerequisite: Must be taken in the first 12 hours of graduate study. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5083. Studies in 20th Century America. Examination through directed discussions of selected topics on the political, social, and cultural aspects of the American experience since the turn of the century with particular emphasis on reform and social change. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5093. Women in Early America. Critical analysis of the lives and experiences of Native American, African-American, and European-American women from 1600 through 1830 through the lenses of race, sexuality, identity, labor, spirituality, and legal status. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5103. Renaissance and Reformations. Cross-cultural study of European culture and society from 1350-1600; Italian, French, Dutch, English, and German artistic achievements, social and political development, and religious reformations compared and contrasted. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5123. Religion in an Atlantic World, 1450-1776. Cross-cultural study of religious ideas and practice in colonial America from the pre-Columbian era through 1776; varied religious experiences of indigenous groups, Spanish, French, English, Dutch, and German colonists, and enslaved African Americans are compared and contrasted. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5143. Early National Period. Creation of a new government from traditional historians' views of John and Abigail Adams, Thomas Jefferson, Sally Hemmings, Alexander Hamilton, and others. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5183. Civil War: Culture, History, and Law. Social, political, and legal context of the War between the States. Analysis of southern secession from the Union, the struggle to restore the Union, and the political and legal struggles of former slaves and their descendants. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5203. Jefferson to Jackson. Period from Thomas Jefferson to Andrew Jackson; historical events concerning the political and social circumstances with a young government. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5253. History of France. Critical analysis of early French history and culture including the Roman conquest, medieval France, the growth of the French monarchy, the Renaissance, the Age of Louis XIV, and the Enlightenment. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5303. Progressives. The early twentieth century era and its social movements; politics, gender, and race issues along with the nation's foreign policy and the continuity of society's social development from a historical perspective. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5333. The Gilded Age. Transformation from an agricultural economy to the mercantile society of American industrialism; impact of speculators, entrepreneurs, industry leaders, and railroad promoters. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5403. American Experience in World War II. How America shaped the War and how the War shaped America including military, social, political, and economic aspects; traditional historians' view on the period. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5413. Civil Rights: Culture, History, and Law. Social, political, and legal concepts of the Civil Rights Movement; historical and legal issues of Jim Crow laws, Plessy vs. Ferguson, and Brown vs. Board of Education Supreme Court decisions; peaceful protests; forms of social disorder in a quest for equal rights. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5423. Native Americans: Culture, History, and Law. Relations between European settlers and Native American tribes with emphasis on cultural differences, land use, and government-tribe relations. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5473. Vietnam War: Culture, History, and Law. Historical context of American involvement in the Vietnam conflict; political decisions of the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations; impact of the war on political protest and social unrest; courts resolution of related controversies; legacy of the war. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5483. War, National Security, and Civil Liberties. Public policy solutions regarding the balance between maintaining national security and protecting civil liberties; history of the nation's attempts to evaluate security policies from colonial times to current events. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5503. Between the Wars. Social, political, and economic history of the U.S. and the wars for particular eras; consumerism, conflicts, music, and literature during the interwar time period. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5603. Professional Practices. Professional practices engaged in by individuals with advanced degrees in history and political science; exploration of issues related to teaching, research, and service. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5703. U.S. Since 1945. Social, political, economic, and multicultural history of the United States from 1945 to September 11th; the Cold War and its influence on American politics, beliefs, and post-Cold War realities; military conflicts, foreign policy, multicultural experiences, and domestic challenges. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5753. Age of Industrialism. Historical, cultural, and legal context for transformation of United States to urbanized, industrial power between 1870 and 1920; impact of railroads, the "Robber Barons," and struggles between organized labor and management. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5763. Studies in Latin American History. An analysis of political, economic, cultural, and intellectual trends from colonial times to the present; emphasis on Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Mexico. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5803. Oral History Methodology. Theories, methods, and debates surrounding the oldest historical tool, oral history; methodology for conducting oral histories, debate, and completing transcripts; consideration of privacy, storage, and accessibility. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5863. Studies in Women's History. Study of shifting roles of women and their struggle for equality in relationship to changes in social, economic, and political institutions in American society. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5883. Seminar in European History. Focused study on a selected theme, issue, problem, region, country, or period in the history of Europe prior to 1900. May be repeated for credit when topics differ. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5903. Special Topics. Organized course with section's title and content varying with specific subject matter and topic offered. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5911. Independent Study. Independent study of selected topics in history. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Credit: One hour.

HIST 5913. Independent Study. Independent study of selected topics in history. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5933. Internship. Supervised practical experience, related to the academic and career objectives of the student, in a public or private agency. May be repeated for a total of six hours. Eight practicum hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5936. Internship. Supervised practical experience, related to the academic and career objectives of the student, in a public or private agency. Sixteen practicum hours a week. Credit: Six hours.

HIST 5973. Professional Paper. The research and writing of a professional paper by each student on a topic selected jointly by the student and the instructor. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5981. The Professional Portfolio. Development of a professional portfolio by students in the Master of Arts in Teaching program demonstrating the student's growth in the Learner-Centered Competencies. Pass-fail grade only. May be repeated. Credit: One hour.

HIST 5983. Thesis. Credit: Three hours.

HIST 5993. Thesis. Prerequisite: HIST 5983. Credit: Three hours.

Professors

BELFIGLIO, VALENTINE, Cornaro Professor of Government. B.S.Pha., Union University; M.A., University of Oklahoma; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma.
HODGES, LYDIA E., Professor of History. B.S., University of North Texas; M.A., Texas Woman's University; Ph.D., Texas Tech University.
HOYE, TIMOTHY K., Professor of Government. B.A., East Texas State University; M.A., East Texas State University; Ph.D., Duke University.
OLSEN, JONATHAN, Professor of Government; Chair of the Department of History and Government. B.A., University of Texas at Austin; M.A., The University of Kansas; M.A., University of Maryland; Ph.D., University of Maryland.
ROBB, JEFFREY B., Professor of Government. B.A., North Texas State University; M.S., University of North Texas; J.D., University of Texas at Austin.
TRAVIS, PAUL D., Professor of History. B.A., The Wichita State University; M.A., Wichita State University; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma.

Associate Professors

BLOSSER, JACOB M., Associate Professor of History. B.A., Milligan College; M.A., James Madison University; Ph.D., University of South Carolina Columbia.
LANDDECK, KATHERINE E., Associate Professor of History. B.A., University of Arkansas; M.A., University of Tennessee, Knoxville; Ph.D., University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Assistant Professors

FANNING, SARA C., Assistant Professor of History. B.A., University of Texas, Austin; M.A., National University of Ireland; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin.
HEVRON, PARKER R., Assistant Professor of Government. B.A., Austin College; Ph.D., University of Southern California.