School of Physical Therapy

This is an archived copy of the 2016-2017 catalog. To access the most recent version of the catalog, please visit http://catalog.twu.edu.

http://www.twu.edu/physical-therapy/

Director: Ann Medley (Dallas), Professor

Associate Directors:
Peggy Gleeson (Houston), Professor

Mary Thompson (Dallas Interim), Professor

Location for information: HDB 202
Phone: 940-898-2460
Fax: 940-898-2853
E-mail: pt@twu.edu

Graduate Degrees Offered


The School of Physical Therapy offers coursework leading to three separate graduate degrees. The professional Doctor of Physical Therapy degree is designed for students who wish to enter the professional field of physical therapy and who hold baccalaureate degrees in other areas. The transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy degree is offered for students who are practicing physical therapists wishing to focus on specific areas for in-depth study. Finally, the Doctor of Philosophy degree is offered to encourage individuals with a professional degree in physical therapy to prepare for future education or research careers.

The Doctor of Physical Therapy degree curriculum for students who wish to enter the field of physical therapy and who hold baccalaureate degrees in other areas is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education. This program requires a minimum of 33 months of study and provides the basic preparation required for national licensure examination. The program begins each fall semester at Texas Woman’s University’s Houston Institute for Heath Sciences, and T. Boone Pickens Institute of Health Sciences at the Dallas Center.

The School also offers coursework toward a transitional Doctor of Physical Therapy degree to physical therapists. The program is offered at both the Houston and Dallas Centers. Courses are offered in weekend and distance learning formats.

The Doctor of Philosophy degree in physical therapy at Texas Woman’s University produces graduates who can become leaders in the field of physical therapy and who are well-prepared to pursue careers in education and research in physical therapy. The curriculum for the Ph.D. provides an environment in which the student analyzes available scientific literature and methodology relevant to solving clinical problems and information in order to conduct productive research. Objectives of the Ph.D. program are:

  1. to increase the professional knowledge and the skills necessary for physical therapists;
  2. to give breadth and depth to the therapist’s education and research through further study in related and interdisciplinary fields;
  3. to synthesize the many areas of knowledge with the student’s ability to conduct research, solve problems, set goals, plan programs, evaluate, and make decisions pertinent to the area of physical therapy.

The Ph.D. program is offered via on-line and on-campus learning experiences in Dallas and Houston.

Admission Requirements

Please see the admission section at the front of this catalog. In addition to these general requirements, the School of Physical Therapy requires the following. (Visit the School of Physical Therapy website for recent updates.)

Professional Doctor of Physical Therapy Degree – an entry-level degree for students who already have a Bachelor of Science or equivalent degree in another field and who are seeking to become physical therapists.

Students with a baccalaureate degree in any major must complete the following prerequisites before registering in the graduate division. They must also meet all requirements for admission to the Graduate School and be accepted by the PT Admissions Committee. A minimum of 3.0 GPA from the last 60 semester credit hours and and a minimum of 3.0 in the math and science prerequisite GPA is required for admission. Admission is competitive. 

Prerequisites

  1. Two semesters of chemistry with laboratory (Chemistry for non-science majors does not meet this prerequisite).
  2. Two semesters of algebra-based physics with laboratory (Physics for non-science majors does not meet this prerequisite).
  3. One semester of college algebra or higher (excluding statistics).
  4. Two semesters of psychology (excluding statistics) including general or introductory psychology and one of the following: lifespan developmental psychology, abnormal psychology or physiological psychology.
  5. Two semesters of anatomy and physiology with labs.
  6. Course in medical terminology.
  7. Current certificates in CPR and AED from the American Heart Association (before entering the program).
  8. Competitive scores on the verbal, quantitative, and writing tests of the Graduate Record Examination.
  9. Exercise physiology, statistics, advanced physiology, and neuroanatomy/physiology are strongly recommended.
  10. A minimum 80 hours observing 2 physical therapists from differently own facilities (40 hours each). Applicants must have both inpatient and outpatient experiences. (Submitted through PTCAS).
  11. Third recommendation may be from employer, professor or 3rd physical therapist from a 3rd facility (Submitted through PTCAS).
  12. TOEFL-with departmental minimum scores in each area, only if bachelor’s degree is not from the USA, contact school for details.

The student may be in the process of completing prerequisites and bachelor’s degree when he or she applies. After acceptance, in order to enroll, the student must have successfully completed a bachelor’s degree and all outstanding prerequisites (courses yet to complete) with grades of A or B (C grades may be reviewed by the admissions committee). Applicants receiving an offer must have a minimum GPA of 3.0 on both their last 60 hours GPA and the prerequisites GPA at the time of application and maintain both GPA’s before beginning the program. Note: The averages of our accepted students are much higher. Prior to enrolling, students must have had immunizations as required by the state of Texas, including 3-Hepatitis B, Tdap (with 9 years), 2- MMR, 2-varicella, TB test (last 6 months), and Hepatitis C testing. In addition, a flu shot is required in the fall of every year while in the program.  Admission to the physical therapy program is competitive and separate from admission to the Graduate School. A limited number of students can be accepted due to limited availability of clinical facilities, space, and faculty.

Please note that entry to the profession in all states requires licensure. Many states have different provisions for licensure, so applicants must determine if they meet these requirements. It is the responsibility of the applicants to insure that they meet requirements for application for licensure in Texas. Testing for drugs and a criminal background check are required during the first semester of the program. If students are unable to be cleared on these requirements, then they may not be eligible to continue in the program.
 

Application Procedure

Doctor of Physical Therapy - Professional

The application cycle begins in July and the final deadline for receipt of materials is approximately October 15th. (See website for exact date as it can change year to year http://www.twu.edu/physical-therapy/entry-level-dpt.asp   ). The PTCAS application opens July 1st one year in advance.   Each Applicant must submit the following before the deadline in October:

  • Online graduate application to TWU on Apply Texas www.applytexas.org with fee.
  • Online application on PTCAS www.ptcas.org with fee and TWU supplemental materials completed (essay, campus preference).
  • Official transcripts from all colleges and universities attended sent to BOTH TWU and PTCAS.
  • Official GRE scores sent to PTCAS and TWU (use code 1673)
  • Resume –emailed to PT@twu.edu    Resume containing data on personal, educational, employment, service and exposure to physical therapy or health care environment.
  • Prerequisite Form-emailed to pt@twu.edu   (Form found on the PT website)

All coursework from a foreign university must be evaluated by TWU’s International Education evaluator to establish U.S. equivalencies. International students must also submit a minimum acceptable score for the TOEFL tests and meet all Graduate School requirements for international applicants (please refer to the TWU International Education   for requirements and exemptions). The School of Physical Therapy requires TOEFL scores of at least 24-writing, 26-speaking, 21-reading comprehension, and 18-listening comprehension.  International students may be required to come for an interview prior to notification of final status.

NOTE: It is advantageous to apply as early as possible in order for you to receive notification if all materials have been received.
 

Doctor of Physical Therapy -Transitional (for students who already have entry-level preparation as a physical therapist)

Students who are practicing clinicians may apply at any time during the year. In addition to the general university requirements these students must present the following:

  • Proof of graduation from an approved entry-level physical therapy program.
  • A license to practice physical therapy in the United States.
  • Bachelor’s or Master’s degree or educational equivalent.
  • A resume/curriculum vitae.
  • One year of full-time physical therapy experience.
  • All coursework from a foreign university must be evaluated by TWU’s International Education Office to establish U.S. equivalencies.
     

Doctor of Philosophy

Students interested in the Ph.D. program may apply at any time. In addition to the general requirements, the School of Physical Therapy requires the following for admission to the doctoral program:

  • Proof of graduation from an approved entry-level physical therapy program.
  • A license to practice physical therapy in the United States or a minimum of 24 months of full time clinical practice (beyond that required for entry-level education) within the last 3 years, is preferred.
  • A basic course in statistics within the last 10 years.
  • A minimum GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 system.
  • Two letters of recommendation, preferably including the latest employer and/or last school attended.
  • A written statement indicating the current focus of professional and research interests including an evaluation of personal strengths and weaknesses.
  • A resume/curriculum vitae.
  • GRE scores preferred but not required.
  • An interview is required. An interview by telephone or with technology may be arranged if circumstances preclude an on-site interview.
  • International students must also submit a minimum acceptable score for the TOEFL tests and meet all Graduate School requirements for international applicants (please refer to the TWU International Education website for requirements and exemptions). The School of Physical Therapy recommends TOEFL scores of at least 24-writing, 26-speaking, 21-reading comprehension, and 18-listening comprehension.
  • All coursework from a foreign university must be evaluated by TWU’s International Education evaluator to establish U.S. equivalencies.

Advanced Practice – Graduate Certificates

Graduate Certificates are available in three areas of practice: Advanced Geriatric Physical Therapy, Advanced Neurologic Physical Therapy, and Women’s Health Physical Therapy. The certificates consist of 12 graduate semester credit hours which can be included as part of the post-professional Doctor of Philosophy degree upon admission as a degree-seeking student.

Minors Offered to Students from Other Departments

A minor is available to licensed physical therapists majoring in other departments.

Courses

PT 6001. Critical Inquiry in Physical Therapy I. Application of the scientific method to research questions in physical therapy. Includes planning of research projects aimed at making contributions to evidence-based physical therapy practice. One contact hour a week. Credit: One hour.

PT 6002. Primary Care in Physical Therapy. Overview of the primary care model of medicine in the context of physical therapy practice; includes medical screening and interdisciplinary collaboration. Two lecture hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

PT 6003. Exam, Evaluation, and Outcomes in Physical Therapy. Practical application of the evaluation strategies associated with functional assessment in physical therapy; emphasis on evidence-based functional assessment, principles, techniques, and related impairment measures. Two lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6011. Critical Inquiry in Physical Therapy II. Application of the scientific method to research in physical therapy. Collaboration with faculty advisors to implement projects proposed in Critical Inquiry I. Prerequisite: PT 6001. Four contact hours a week. Credit: One hour.

PT 6013. Supervised Teaching in Physical Therapy. Supervised teaching for physical therapy students. Laboratory teaching under close supervision of the faculty. Weekly meetings with the instructor, individual consultation, and reports. Prerequisites: Degree in physical therapy and permission of instructor. Seven practicum hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6014. Clinical Management in Internal Medicine. Gross and histological reactions of tissue, organs, and systems to injury or disease; correlation of pathology with clinical signs and symptoms; medical management of disease processes, genetic conditions, and injuries commonly seen by physical therapists with emphasis on internal medicine. Four lecture hours a week. Credit: Four hours.

PT 6015. Human Gross Anatomy. Study of the structure and function of the human body; introduction to surface anatomy, radiology, embryology, and histology through regional dissection of the body. Three lecture and six laboratory hours a week. Credit: Five hours.

PT 6021. Critical Inquiry in Physical Therapy III. Application of the scientific method to research in physical therapy. Evaluation, summary, and presentation of project results in a public forum. Prerequisite: PT 6011. Four contact hours a week. Credit: One hour.

PT 6022. Clinical Management of the Musculoskeletal System. Pathology and medical management of disease processes, genetic conditions, and injuries commonly seen by physical therapists with emphasis on musculoskeletal disorders. Two lecture hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

PT 6023. Research for Clinical Scientists in Physical Therapy. Research design and statistical analysis; critical evaluation of published research relevant to physical therapy; scientific writing; preparation for conducting clinical research. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6024. Clinical Neuroscience. Organization and physiological function of the human nervous system with emphasis on topics relevant to the practice of physical therapy. Three lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Four hours.

PT 6032. Clinical Management of the Neuromuscular System. Pathology and medical management of disease processes, genetic conditions, and injuries commonly seen by physical therapists with emphasis on neuromuscular disorders. Two lecture hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

PT 6033. Research in Physical Therapy. Critical analysis of published research relevant to physical therapy; securing and evaluating evidence for clinical decision-making; research design and statistical analysis; and preparation for participation in collaborative research. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6041. Introduction to Exercise Testing and Prescription in Physical Therapy. Basic physiological responses to activity or exercise and physiological adaptations in response to training; energy storage and utilization as well as exercise prescriptions for healthy individuals and clients with selected diseases. Student participation in exercise testing and programs during lab sessions. Two laboratory hours a week. Credit: One hour.

PT 6043. Statistical Methods I for the Health Care Professional. Application of statistical procedures to answer health-related research questions or problems. Analyzing, interpreting, and reporting results of univariate, one-factor analyses of health care data. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6061. Basic Physical Therapy Skills. Application of physical therapy treatment procedures with primary emphasis on such basic patient care techniques as transfers, positioning, assisted exercise, and assisted gait. Two laboratory hours a week. Credit: One hour.

PT 6072. Developmental Concepts: Adolescence to Geriatrics. Changes associated with age in the neurosensory, neuromuscular, cardiovascular, pulmonary, integumentary, and musculoskeletal systems as related to physical therapy management. One lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

PT 6073. Medical Kinesiology. Physical therapy analysis of biomechanical and kinesiological principles of human movement and function with emphasis on the relationships among movement, structure, and force. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6082. Professional Practice in Physical Therapy. Orientation to professional aspects of physical therapy, including communication, cultural competence, documentation, ethics, evidence-based practice, legal issues, and effective teaching strategies. Two lecture hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

PT 6083. Advanced Instrumentation in Physical Therapy. Technical and practical considerations necessary for the effective use of instrumentation common in the physical therapy and rehabilitation fields. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6101. Practicum in Physical Therapy. Supervised experience in a specialized area of interest such as administration, teaching, research, or advanced evaluation and treatment procedures. Prerequisites: Degree in physical therapy and permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit. Four practicum hours a week. Credit: One hour.

PT 6102. Practice Management Issues I. Application of practice management issues in the physical therapy setting: emphasis on communication, documentation, supervision, reimbursement, time management, and psychosocial aspects of patient care in preparation for first clinical affiliation. Two lecture hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

PT 6103. Advanced Practicum in Physical Therapy. Supervised experience in a specialized area of interest such as administration, teaching, research, or advanced evaluation and treatment procedures. Prerequisites: Degree in physical therapy and permission of instructor. Nine practicum hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6111. Practice Management Issues II. Overview of various influences within the health care environment, including payment systems, development of public policy and legislation, and the scope of physical therapy practice at the local, state, and federal levels. Prerequisite: PT 6102. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

PT 6113. Directed Practicum in Physical Therapy. Directed practical experience in a specialized area of physical therapy; content may include teaching, administration, research, or application of advanced clinical procedures. Prerequisites: Degree in physical therapy and permission of instructor. Eight practicum hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6121. Practice Management Issues III. Exploration of the leadership role of the physical therapist as a manager of clinical services. Prerequisite: PT 6111. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

PT 6122. Prostheses, Orthoses, and Advanced Gait. Pathological gait of patients with neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, and/or integumentary involvement. Includes prostheses, orthoses, changes in gait across the lifespan, energy costs, therapeutic interventions, and patient/family education. One lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

PT 6123. Physical Therapy Patient/Client Management. Knowledge and skills to enhance the clinical decision-making process, including screening, physical therapy examination, evaluation of findings, diagnosis, prognosis, plan of care development, intervention, and outcome measurement in clients with disorders managed by physical therapists. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6131. Practice Management Issues IV. Overview of healthcare delivery and payment systems related to physical therapy practice. Includes governmental and legal parameters, and current issues facing the continuum of care. Prerequisite: PT 6121. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

PT 6141. Clinical Integration I. Integration of curricular content to date within the framework of a collaborative problem-based learning model; emphasis on clinical reasoning and problem solving. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

PT 6142. Health Promotion and Wellness I. Overview of health promotion, fitness, and wellness strategies for well individuals and those with functional limitations commonly seen in physical therapy practice; emphasis on attitudes towards health, illness, and disability and their effect on individual goals, motivations, and interpersonal relationships. Two lecture hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

PT 6143. Leadership and Management in Physical Therapy. Principles of leadership and management for physical therapy practice, including ethical behaviors and beliefs; change management; motivating, coaching, and mentoring; life-long learning; business and strategic planning; financial management; personnel recruitment and retention; liability issues and risk management; effective marketing and consulting skills. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6151. Psychosocial Aspects of Rehabilitation. Psychosocial issues related to physical therapy; includes the roles of mental health professionals, advocates, and family; patient-therapist communication; sexuality and disability; and abuse. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

PT 6152. Health Promotion and Wellness II. Public health, social responsibility, and participation in physical therapy practice; emphasis on improving health outcomes in well and disabled populations. Prerequisite: PT 6142. One lecture and two practicum hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

PT 6153. Advanced Diagnostic Imaging for the Physical Therapist. Principles and production of diagnostic imaging; terminology and psychometric properties of imaging tools; integration of diagnostic imaging information into physical therapy examination, evaluation, and intervention. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6161. Therapeutic Exercise and Intervention IV. Advanced soft tissue interventions and complementary exercise approaches to physical therapy patient care. Prerequisite: PT 6162. Two laboratory hours a week. Credit: One hour.

PT 6162. Therapeutic Exercise and Intervention II : Lower Quadrant. Use of therapeutic exercise and other interventions (e.g., soft tissue techniques, orthotics/taping, and integration of therapeutic modalities) for the treatment of impairments; activity limitations; and participation restrictions in patients who have musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, or integumentary system involvement of the lower quadrant. Prerequisite: PT 6173. One lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

PT 6171. Therapeutic Exercise and Intervention III: Upper Quadrant. Use of therapeutic exercise and other interventions (e.g., soft tissue techniques, orthotics/taping, and integration of therapeutic modalitites) for the treatment of impairments and functional/activity limitations in patients of all ages who have musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, or integumentary system involvement of the upper quadrant. Prerequisites: PT 6173 and PT 6162. Two laboratory hours a week. Credit: One hour.

PT 6173. Therapeutic Exercise and Intervention I. Principles of basic therapeutic exercise, soft tissue techniques, and adjunctive biophysical agents; emphasis on management of patients in the acute phase of recovery/healing from soft tissue injuries or surgery, including detection/prevention of post-operative complications and adverse effects of immobilization. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6181. Professional Development for the Physical Therapist. Exploration of issues related to maintaining and expanding professional competence in the broad context of physical therapy practice. Prerequisites: PT 6082, PT 6102, PT 6111, and PT 6121. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

PT 6191. Applied Statistical Methods for the Health Care Professional. Application of appropriate statistical analysis to health care related clinical research examples and datasets with appropriate rationale for selected analysis. Prerequisites: PT 6043 and PT 6243. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

PT 6193. Psychometric Properties of Rehabilitatio. Assessment of the uses, advantages, reliability, validity, and sources of error of evaluation procedures and measurement tools commonly used in physical therapy. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6203. Orthopedic Evaluation and Treatment of the Geriatric Client. The study of orthopedic assessment and treatment applied to the geriatric client. Includes background information on aging theories and age-related changes but focus is on evaluation, PT differential diagnosis, and rehabilitation of orthopedic problems common to the elderly. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6213. Computer Applications in Physical Therapy Research. Application of research design and computer systems to problems in physical therapy research. Emphasis on advanced computational skills for the clinical researcher and academician. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6243. Statistical Methods II for the Health Care Professional. Application of advanced statistical procedures to health-related research questions or problems. Analyzing, interpreting, and reporting results of multivariate, multi-factor, and regression analyses of health care data. Prerequisite: PT 6043. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6263. Illness Prevention and Health Promotion. Recognize public health issues across the lifespan and resources relevant to physical therapist practice, including basic nutrition; designing plans for preventing illness and promoting health and wellness for selected populations. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6302. Integumentary Physical Therapy. Integration of basic and clinical sciences in the physical therapy examination, differential diagnosis, and treatment of patients with pathologies, impairments, and disabilities involving the integumentary and vascular systems. One lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

PT 6303. Field Research in Physical Therapy. Designs, data collection techniques, and analyses for field research in physical therapy. Critical application of surveys, observational studies, case studies, and single case designs to clinical field problems in physical therapy. Emphasis is on the development of analytical skills requisite for field research in physical therapy. Prerequisites: Degree in physical therapy and permission of instructor. Seven practicum hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6323. Neuromuscular Physical Therapy I. Principles of evaluation and physical therapy treatment of patients with neuromuscular complications associated with brain injury and cerebral vascular accident; emphasis on current theories of motor control and therapeutic interventions. Two lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6333. Health Care Delivery Systems. Overview of health delivery systems in the U.S. and Texas. Emphasis on government and private sector involvement in health services to older adults with applications for the physical therapist. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6343. Neuromuscular Physical Therapy II. Principles of evaluation and physical therapy treatment of patients with neuromusculoskeletal conditions including, but not limited to, spinal cord injury and vestibular disorders; emphasis on current treatment models. Prerequisite: PT 6323. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6353. Pediatric Physical Therapy. Normal motor, cognitive, and psycho-social development; neonatology; evaluation and treatment of children with developmental disorders and other chronic medical conditions; pediatric sports medicine; and legal and ethical considerations. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6363. Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy: Lower Quadrant. Principles of evaluation and physical therapy treatment of patients with musculoskeletal problems of the lumbar spine, pelvis, and lower extremities; emphasis on manual therapy strategies. Two lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6373. Musculoskeletal Physical Therapy: Upper Quadrant. Evaluation and physical therapy management of patients with musculoskeletal disorders of the cervico-thoracic spine and upper extremity; emphasis on manual therapy and functional rehabilitation. Two lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6383. Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy. Physical therapy evaluation and management of patients with cardiovascular and/or pulmonary diseases. Emphasis on the integration of results from diagnostic tests and measures with physical findings in order to develop plans of care and implement appropriate intervention. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6403. Neuromuscular Integration and Applications. A comprehensive foundation for the management of the person with a neuromuscular pathology for the practicing physical therapist using the older person post-stroke as a model. Emphasis on securing and applying relevant in-depth information. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6413. Cardiopulmonary Integration and Application. A comprehensive foundation for the management of persons with cardiovascular and/or pulmonary pathology for the practicing physical therapist using the older person as a model. Emphasis on securing and applying relevant in-depth information. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6453. Principles Geriatric Physical Therapy II. Aging theories and age-related changes; chronic problems associated with aging, critical examination of anti-aging research, and effect of physical aging on other dimensions of life; applications for therapist practice including health promotion and wellness. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6483. Principles of Geriatric in Physical Therapy I. Principles of gerontology with emphasis on psychological processes and social aspects of aging with implications for physical therapists. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6503. Introduction to Grantsmanship in Physical Therapy. Overview of concepts in constructive research leading to competitive grantsmanship for physical therapists. May include invited presentations of funded projects, exemplary research proposals, and grant management. Students will identify funding sources and develop a grant proposal. Prerequisites: PT 6023 and PT 6193, or equivalent, or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6513. Topics in Evidence-Based Practice. Search and appraisal of evidence for tests and measures, interventions, diagnosis, and prognosis used in advanced physical therapist practice; clinical decisions based on the evidence. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6523. Teaching and Learning in Physical Therapy. Preparation for careers in physical therapy higher education; concepts and techniques of effective teaching and enhanced learning, such as theories of learning, teaching styles, methods of instruction, syllabus development, and evaluation/assessment processes. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6533. Academic Issues in Physical Therapist Education. Organizational and functional aspects of graduate professional educational program. Includes university structure and governance, models of scholarship, faculty roles, faculty issues (tenure, promotion, academic freedom, development), student issues (recruitment, retention, advising/mentoring), and clinical education. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6603. Female Anatomy for Physical Therapists. Anatomy and physiology of urogenital and endocrine systems of women. Includes cadaveric dissection and laboratory study of female reproductive tract, external genitalia, pelvic floor, breasts, and related structures. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6613. Women's Health for Physical Therapists. Specialization and evidence-based practice in women's health, medical and physical therapist management of common conditions and procedures, and issues for female athletes. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6623. Physical Therapy Management of Women's Health I. Physical therapist management of women with focus on musculoskeletal issues of pelvis and abdomen for the non-pregnant woman. Includes pelvic examination for physical therapist practice, differential diagnosis, and evidence-based interventions. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6633. Physical Therapy Management of Women's Health II. Physical therapist management of women with focus on musculoskeletal issues of pelvis and abdomen for the pregnant woman. Includes management of high risk pregnancy and post-partum care. Prerequisite: PT 6623. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6663. Advanced Differential Diagnosis in Orthopedic Physical Therapy. Principles of differential diagnosis in orthopedic manual therapy; development of critical clinical thinking in orthopedics, basic medical screening, rational differential diagnosis, and selection of manual and mechanical interventions of the musculoskeletal system. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6673. Intermediate Evaluation and Mobilization: Lower Quadrant. Interpretation of basic science knowledge and development of clinical skills needed to complete a differential evaluation and proceed to effective treatment of spinal dysfunction. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6683. Intermediate Evaluation and Mobilization: Upper Quadrant. Interpretation of basic science knowledge and development of clinical skills needed to complete a differential evaluation and proceed to effective treatment of craniofacial region dysfunction, and cervical and thoracic spine dysfunction. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6731. Preliminary Clinical Experience. Supervised, part time, onsite exposure to the inpatient clinical environment. Emphasis on observation and reflection of characteristics of professional practice as demonstrated by various health care providers. Four clinical hours a week. Credit: One hour.

PT 6733. Clinical Experience I. First of three supervised full-time clinical experiences. Application of physical therapy knowledge, skills, and behaviors appropriate to patient and practice management in the acute care setting. One lecture and sixteen clinical hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6802. Clinical Integration II. Clinical decision-making for complex patients with multi-system involvement; includes practice management issues such as accountability and outcomes assessment. Prerequisite: PT 6141. Two lecture hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

PT 6804. Clinical Experience II. Second of three supervised full-time clinical experiences; application of physical therapy knowledge, skills, and behaviors appropriate to patient and practice management in either the orthopedic or neuro-rehabilitation setting. Prerequisite: PT 6733. Eighteen to twenty clinical hours a week. Credit: Four hours.

PT 6814. Clinical Experience III. Third of three supervised full-time clinical experiences; application of physical therapy knowledge, skills, and behaviors appropriate to patient and practice management in either the orthopedic or neuro-rehabilitation setting. Prerequisite: PT 6804. Eighteen to twenty clinical hours a week. Credit: Four hours.

PT 6816. Clinical Internship. Directed clinical internship in selected area(s) of physical therapy practice culminating in effective clinical decision making for autonomous practice and professional development. Prerequisite: PT 6814. Thirty-two clinical hours a week. Credit: Six hours.

PT 6823. Advanced Evaluation and Mobilization: Lower Quadrant. Study of advanced biomechanical tests and treatments, including manipulation, applied to the lumbar spine, peripheral joints of the lower extremity, pelvis, and sacroiliac joint. Emphasis on techniques that integrate joint function. Prerequisites: PT 6673 and PT 6683, or permission of instructor. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6833. Advanced Evaluation and Mobilization: Upper Quadrant. Study of advanced biomechanical tests and treatments, including manipulation, applied to the cervical and thoracic spine, peripheral joints of the upper extremity, and temporomandibular joint. Emphasis on techniques that integrate joint function. Prerequisites: PT 6673 and PT 6683, or permission of instructor. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6901. Special Topics. Concentrated study of a particular topic in physical therapy. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

PT 6903. Special Topics. Concentrated study of a particular topic in physical therapy. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6911. Independent Study. Variable content. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Credit: One hour.

PT 6913. Independent Study. Variable content. Individual research or study relating to a problem of professional interest and significance. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6983. Dissertation. May be repeated for credit. Only three credits apply toward degree. Credit: Three hours.

PT 6993. Dissertation. May be repeated for credit. Only three credits apply toward degree. Prerequisite: PT 6983. Credit: Three hours.

Professors

BARTLETT, WILLIAM P., Professor of Physical Therapy. B.S., State University of New York, Stony Brook; Ph.D., Albany Medical College.
DA SILVA, CAROLYN P., Professor of Physical Therapy. B.A., Rice University; M.S., Texas Woman's University; D.Sc., University of Alabama, Birmingham.
GLEESON, PEGGY B., Professor of Physical Therapy; Associate Director of the School of Physical Therapy : Houston. B.S., St. Louis University; M.S., Texas Woman's University; Ph.D., Texas Woman's University.
MEDLEY, SYLVIA ANN, Professor of Physical Therapy; Director of the School of Physical Therapy. B.A., University of Texas at Austin; B.S., University of Texas Health Science Center-Dallas; M.S., Texas Woman's University; Ph.D., University of Texas at Dallas.
ORTIZ RODRIGUEZ, ALEXIS, Professor of Physical Therapy. B.S., University of Puerto Rico; M.S., Texas Woman's University; Ph.D., Texas Woman's University.
PRICE, SHARON S., Professor of Physical Therapy. B.S., National Taiwan University : Taipei, Taiwan; M.S., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., Texas Woman's University.
RODDEY, TONI S., Professor of Physical Therapy. B.S., University of Texas Medical Branch; M.S., Texas Woman's University; Ph.D., Texas Woman's University.
THOMPSON, MARY E., Professor of Physical Therapy. B.S, University of Kentucky; M.S., Texas Woman's University; Ph.D., University of North Texas.
TRUDELLE-JACKSON, ELAINE, Professor of Physical Therapy. B.S., Texas Woman's University; M.S., University of North Texas; Ph.D., Texas Woman's University.

Associate Professors

LIN, SUH-JEN, Associate Professor of Physical Therapy. B.A., National Taiwan University; M.S., Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions; Ph.D., University of Iowa.
MITCHELL, KATY E., Associate Professor of Physical Therapy. B.S., University of California, Davis; M.S., Pacific University; Ph.D., Texas Woman's University.

Assistant Professors

BREWER, WAYNE A., Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy. B.A., University of Pittsburgh; M.P.H., University of Pittsburgh; Ph.D., Texas Woman's University.
BRIZZOLARA, KELLI J., Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy. B.S., Texas A&M University; M.S., Texas Woman's University; Ph.D., Texas Woman's University.
CSIZA, LINDA A., Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy. B.S., Texas Woman's University; M.S., Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions; D.Sc., Rocky Mountain University of Health Professions.
GOH, HUI-TING, Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy. M.S., Texas Woman's University; Ph.D., University of Southern California.
SWANK, CHAD D., Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy. B.A., Point Loma Nazarene College; M.S., Regis University; Ph.D., Texas Woman's University.
TSENG, SHIH-CHIAO, Assistant Professor of Physical Therapy. B.S., National Cheng Kung University; M.S., National Taiwan University; Ph.D., University of Maryland, Baltimore.

Associate Clinical Professor

PATEL, RUPAL M., Associate Clinical Professor of Physical Therapy. B.S., Texas Woman's University; M.S., Texas Woman's University.

Assistant Clinical Professors

ANDERLE, DALE W., Assistant Clinical Professor of Physical Therapy. B.A., University of North Texas; M.S., Texas Woman's University; D.P.T., A.T. Still University.
SHIRLEY, KATHLEEN, Assistant Clinical Professor of Physical Therapy. B.S., East Carolina University; D.P.T., Texas Woman's University.
SZOT, C. LAUREN, Assistant Clinical Professor of Physical Therapy. B.S., Louisiana State University; M.S., D.P.T., Louisiana State University Health Science Center..