Department of English, Speech, and Foreign Languages

http://www.twu.edu/english-speech-foreign-languages/

Chair: M. Genevieve West, Professor
Location: CFO 906
Phone: 940-898-2324
Fax: 940-898-2297
E-mail: gwest@twu.edu

Graduate Degrees Offered

The Department of English, Speech, and Foreign Languages offers programs of study leading to the Master of Arts degree in English and to the Doctor of Philosophy in Rhetoric. The major objectives of the department include both the provision of broad cultural foundations and the preparation of students for a variety of careers: teaching, administration, publishing, business, and government service. The department emphasizes literature, composition, and rhetoric. The M.A. student may specialize in British or American literature or in rhetoric. The Ph.D. student specializes in rhetoric. The department’s emphasis on rhetoric is a coordinating force among the basic issues within each field offered in the department.  Students without appropriate undergraduate preparation will be asked to complete a deficiency plan of 12-15 hours of undergraduate courses in English prior to beginning graduate course work.

Admission Requirements

Students interested in applying to graduate programs in English and Rhetoric are encouraged to contact the appropriate program coordinator prior to applying.  All applications are considered in toto as the department seeks to meet the needs of diverse students. Writing samples and statements of purpose are of particular importance in the application process.  GRE scores noted below are preferences and are considered in light of other application materials.

All students must meet the general admission requirements of the Graduate School at TWU.  Students applying to either graduate program who lack the appropriate foundational degree (the bachelor's or master's) in English, literature, writing or rhetoric may be required to complete a deficiency plan prior to beginning graduate courses in English. Specific requirements depend on an individual student's undergraduate course work in the discipline but may include 12-15 hours.  Additional information on deficiency plans may be obtained from the appropriate program coordinator.

Graduate Assistantships and Teaching Assistantships are available to students enrolled in both programs.  Assistantships are competitive as they provide stipends and out-of-state tuition waivers.  For best consideration, students are encouraged to apply for assistantships at the same time they apply to the program.  Additional information about types of work available and expectations can be obtained from the program coordinator.  Please forward your application to the department chair at gwest@twu.edu.  A personal interview may be required for graduate students who are seeking an assistantship.

MA in English

Departmental application requirements for the MA include the following: a bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited institution, a preferred score of 500 (153, Revised GRE) on the verbal section of the GRE and a preferred score of 350 (138, Revised GRE) on the quantitative section of the GRE; a minimum of a 3.0 grade point average required on previous upper division and graduate work; official transcripts; three letters of recommendation; an academic writing sample and statement of purpose; and a score of 600 on TOEFL for international students.  Please note:  The department will waive the GRE requirement for students with a bachelor’s degree in English, Rhetoric, Literature, or Writing and a GPA of 3.75 or higher in the major from a regionally accredited institution. 

M.A. applications are reviewed three times per year. Applications are due by July 1 for Fall admission, November 1 for Spring admission, and April 1 for Summer admission.

PhD in Rhetoric

Departmental application requirements for the PhD include the following: a master's degree from a regionally accredited institution, a preferred score of 500 (153, Revised GRE) on the verbal section of the GRE and a preferred score of 350 (138, Revised GRE) on the quantitative section of the GRE; a minimum of a 3.0 grade point average required on previous upper division and graduate work; official transcripts; three letters of recommendation; an academic writing sample and statement of purpose; and a score of 600 on TOEFL for international students. Admission to the program is competitive as program size is limited.

Doctoral applications are reviewed once per year and are due by February 1.

Minor Offered to Students from Other Departments

The department offers master’s and doctoral-level minors in English. The needs of the individual graduate student determine the contents of a minor.  

Courses

ENG 5033. Chaucer. Major works of Chaucer studied as literature and as linguistic examples of Middle English; attention to significant scholarship and criticism. May be repeated for credit when the specific works to be studied vary. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5083. Bibliography and Research Methods. Methods of research, with focus on techniques appropriate to the thesis or dissertation. May be repeated for up to twelve hours credit. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5103. Introduction to Graduate Studies in English. Introduction to English study at the graduate level, with attention to scholarly conventions and to common analytical and critical practices. Required enrollment in first fall semester. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5123. Medieval Drama. Directed investigation of a problem in the dramatic and non-dramatic literature of the sixteenth century. May be repeated for credit when the specific topic of investigation varies. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5143. Drama of the Restoration and the Eighteenth Century. Representative comedies, tragedies, and other plays studied as reflections of the literary trends of the period. Attention to significant criticism and to the position of this drama in the development of the English drama. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5153. Studies in Twentieth-Century American and British Literature. Directed investigation of a topic relating to a trend, a work, a genre, or an author in twentieth-century American and/or British literature. May be repeated for credit when the topic of investigation varies. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5173. Studies in Ethnic, Multicultural, and Cross Cultural Literature. Literature in English by authors whose work reflects the experience of ethnic or minority groups. Focus on themes, genres, particular groups, authors, or historical periods. May be repeated for credit when specific topic of investigation varies. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5213. Studies in the English Renaissance. Directed investigation of a problem in the dramatic and non-dramatic literature of the sixteenth century. May be repeated for credit when the specific topic of investigation varies. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5223. Studies in Seventeenth-Century Poetry and Prose. Directed investigation of a problem in the literary career of a writer, in a single work, or in an aspect of the century related to literature. May be repeated for credit when the specific topic of investigation varies. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5233. Studies in the Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Directed investigation of a problem relating to such subjects as an author, a work, a genre, an idea, a critical principle, an aesthetic theory. May be repeated for credit when the specific topic of investigation varies. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5243. Studies in the Romantic Period. Directed investigation of a topic related to genre, style, thought, critical theory, and the interrelationship of the artist and his or her art in the Romantic Period or to a major poet, such as Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, or Keats. May be repeated for credit when the specific topic of investigation varies. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5253. Studies in Victorian Period. Directed investigation of a topic related to genre, style, thought, critical theory, and the interrelationship of the artist and his or her art in the Victorian Period, or major authors. May be repeated when the topic varies. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5263. Studies in American Literature. Directed investigation of a problem in the literary career of a writer, in a work, or in a trend in American literature. May be repeated for credit when the specific topic of investigation varies. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5273. Studies in Fiction. Directed investigation of a problem in English or American fiction in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and/or twentieth centuries. May be repeated for credit when the specific topic of investigation varies. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5283. Studies in Literary Criticism. The schools of criticism, focusing on postmodern criticism; the application of some critical theories to the practice of rhetoric; critical theory in a given period. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5333. Studies in Writing in Networked Environments. Classroom and business application of rhetorical principles to writing for Internet, electronic communication, and information systems. Emphasis on audience, genre, style, and arrangement. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5343. Rhetoric and Composition: Theory and Practice. Introduction to theory and research in rhetoric and composition with special emphasis on preparation for teaching college composition. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5353. Rhetoric and Composition: Theory and Pedagogy of Electronic Texts. Rhetorical theories and techniques of teaching with non-print texts, particular attention to writing and literature. Investigates interactions between text and image. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: ENG 5343. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5363. Studies in Linguistics. Directed investigation of problems such as feminism and language, pragmatics, discourse analysis, linguistics, and composition. May be repeated for credit when the specific topic of investigation varies. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5373. Professional and Academic Communication. Topics such as managerial communication, academic writing, and technical writing. Projects develop writing and communication skills in the student's discipline. May be repeated when topic varies. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5393. Women and American Literature. Focus on changing images of female characters and on contributions of female writers throughout American literature. Emphasis may be on fiction or on poetry and drama. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5703. Studies in Folklore. Focus on the major aspects of folklore, particularly the transmission of knowledge and cultural values through the oral tradition. Special emphasis on the impact of folklore on literature. May be repeated for credit when the specific topic of the investigation varies. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5713. Old and Middle English Language and Literature. Topics in language and literature before 1500 including history and development of the language before 1500, and survey of Old and Middle English literature. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5801. Directed Readings in English. Directed readings in preparation for the Master's Examination. Prerequisite: 18 graduate hours in English with a grade of B or higher. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

ENG 5903. Special Topics. Investigation in traditional lecture format of a specific literary or linguistic topic. May be repeated for credit when the specific topic of investigation varies. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5913. Independent Study. Intensive investigation of a literary or linguistic area. Conferences, readings, lectures. May be repeated for credit when the specific topic of investigation varies. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5953. Cooperative Education. Cooperative work-study arrangements between the University and business, industry, or selected institutions appropriate to the graduate English program. Job assignments are made on the basis of student interests, skills, and degree program. The student will apply the ideas and processes learned in other courses in practical experience under cooperative supervision. Cooperative planning and evaluation are essential elements in the course. For three hours of credit, 15-20 hours of work per week are required. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5973. Professional Paper. May be repeated. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5981. The Professional Portfolio. Development of a professional portfolio by students in the Master of Arts in Teaching program demonstrating the student's growth in the Learner-Centered Competencies. Pass-fail grade only. May be repeated. Credit: One hour.

ENG 5983. Thesis. May be repeated. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 5993. Thesis. Prerequisite: ENG 5983. May be repeated. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 6063. Writing in the Discipline. Development of documents common in rhetorical and literary studies. Genres may include CV, job application materials, abstracts, book reviews, prospecti, presentations, articles, and teaching philosophies. Prerequisite: Six hours of graduate level coursework with a grade of B or higher. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 6083. Research Methods in Rhetoric and Composition. Students design and conduct research through methods such as textual, ethnographic, historical, and empirical analysis in rhetoric and composition. Students learn to discriminate among types of research, examine scholarship critically, and select appropriate research designs. Seminar and research projects. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 6123. Milton. The major poetic works and selected prose works of John Milton, against the background of seventeenth-century English life. Attention to significant scholarship and criticism. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 6203. History of Rhetoric I. Foundations of ancient and classical rhetoric. Readings in Plato, Aristotle, Quintilian, and others. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 6213. History of Rhetoric II. Historical survey of rhetoric from the medieval period through the Renaissance. Readings in medieval rhetorical handbooks, schools in Renaissance, humanism, poetics, and rhetoric in the seventeenth century. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 6223. History of Rhetoric III. Historical survey of rhetoric from the Enlightenment to the present. Readings in Locke, Vico; contributions of Blair, Campbell, and Whatley; pulpit oratory; elocution; American composition and rhetoric; new perspectives; contemporary rhetorical strategies; invention as discourse theory. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 6313. Studies in Rhetorical Criticism and Discourse Analysis. Directed investigation of topics in semiotics, narratology, discourse analysis, and stylistics as approaches to written texts and other forms of symbolic communication. May be repeated for credit when the specific topic of investigation varies. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 6323. Studies in Feminist Rhetoric. Directed investigation of problems in feminism and rhetoric such as feminist histories of rhetoric, feminist rhetorical theories, feminist composition pedagogy, feminism and technology, and feminist epistemology. May be repeated for credit when the specific topic of investigation varies. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 6343. Major Rhetorical Theories. Intensive investigation of selected major rhetoricians and schools of rhetorical thought within the history and development of rhetoric. Prerequisite: ENG 6203 or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit up to 12 hours when specific topic of investigation varies. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 6733. Studies in the Profession of Rhetoric and Composition. Current theoretical issues and skills needed for professions in academic and non-academic settings, such as administering writing programs, designing cross-discipline writing programs, or pursuing careers in writing and editing in business settings. May be repeated for credit when topic of investigation varies. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 6801. Directed Readings in Rhetoric. Directed readings in an area of literary and/or rhetorical studies. Student must be concurrently completing or have completed all required organized courses. May be taken twice for credit. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

ENG 6903. Special Topics. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 6913. Independent Study. Intensive investigation of a literary, rhetorical, or linguistic area. Conferences, readings, lectures. May be repeated for credit when the specific topic of investigation varies. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and an undergraduate concentration in English. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 6983. Dissertation. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the qualifying examination. May be repeated for additional credit. Credit: Three hours.

ENG 6993. Dissertation. May be repeated for additional credit. Prerequisite: ENG 6983. Credit: Three hours.

Professors

BRIDGES, PHYLLIS J., Cornaro Professor of English. B.A., West Texas A&M University; M.A., West Texas A&M University; Ph.D., Texas Tech University.
SOURIS, STEPHEN W., Professor of English. B.A., Harvard University; M.A., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison.
THOMPSON, LOU A., Professor of English. B.A., University of North Texas; M.A., Louisiana State University; Ph.D., Texas Christian University.
WEST, M. GENEVIEVE, Professor of English; Chair of the Department of English, Speech, and Foreign Languages. B.A., Mississippi State University; M.A., Mississippi State University; Ph.D., Florida State University.

Associate Professors

CASPER, VIVIAN C., Associate Professor of English. B.A., Washburn University; M.A., Rice University; Ph.D., Rice University.
FEHLER, BRIAN, Associate Professor of English. B.A., Texas Wesleyan University; M.A., Texas Christian University; Ph.D., Texas Christian University.
GREER, RUSSELL, Associate Professor of English. A.B.J., University of Georgia; A.L.M., Harvard University; Ph.D., University of Georgia.
LITTON, ALFRED GUY, Associate Professor of English; Executive Director of Honors Programs. B.A., University of Arkansas; M.A., University of Central Arkansas; Ph.D., University of South Carolina, Columbia.

Assistant Professors

BROWN, MATTHEW C., Assistant Professor of English. B.A., University of Florida; B.S., University of Florida; M.A., University of Toronto; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame.
BUSL, GRETCHEN L., Assistant Professor of English. B.A., Mount Holyoke College; Ph.D., University of Notre Dame.
LACKEY, DUNDEE C., Assistant Professor of English. B.F.A., Texas State University; M.A., Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi; Ph.D., Michigan State University.
SCOTT, GRAHAM R., Assistant Professor of English. B.A., California State University, San Bernardino; M.A., University of California, Riverside; Ph.D., University of California, Riverside.