Department of Sociology and Social Work

http://www.twu.edu/sociology-social-work/

Chair: Celia Lo, Professor
Location: CFO 305
Phone: 940-898-2052
Fax: 940-898-2067
E-mail: clo@twu.edu

Graduate Degrees Offered

Master of Arts in Sociology

The objective of the sociology program is to produce intellectually well-rounded graduates capable of (1) analyzing human social groups and relationships between groups, (2) evaluating the influence of social factors on social situations, and (3) functioning effectively in either an academic milieu or in a sociological practice setting.

Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology

The objective of the sociology program is to produce intellectually well-rounded graduates capable of (1) analyzing human social groups and relationships between groups, (2) evaluating the influence of social factors on social situations, and (3) functioning effectively in either an academic milieu or in a sociological practice setting. Doctoral students are required to study core sociological theory, social research methods, and statistics, and must concentrate further in two specialty areas. 

The Doctor of Philosophy degree in Sociology is offered through a cooperative program of the Federation of North Texas Area Universities that includes Texas Woman’s University, the University of North Texas, and Texas A&M – Commerce. The Ph.D. in Sociology is granted by Texas Woman’s University and the University of North Texas. Students apply for acceptance into the Ph.D. program through one of the participating universities. Together the two universities offer graduate training in various aspects of sociology along with opportunities in the area of sociological practice. Ph.D. students enrolled at either TWU or UNT take courses at both universities, thus benefiting from the combined faculties and facilities of both schools. Students graduating from the Federation program will be granted the Ph.D. from the university through which they entered the program.

Master of Social Work

The Joint MSW (JMSW) is a collaborative program between Texas Woman’s University and the University of North Texas (UNT).  The MSW is considered by many to be one of the most recognized and marketable social services degree. Graduates are eligible to sit for licensure as a Licensed Master Social Worker (LMSW) and, with two years of supervision, become a Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW). 

TWU and UNT have developed a unique opportunity for students in which half of their classes are at TWU and half are at UNT. JMSW students are assigned a home institution, but are members of one student body, with Social Work faculty from both institutions.

Master of Arts in Sociology

Students applying for admission to master study must meet the general admission requirements of the Graduate School at TWU (see admission section of this catalog.) Admission to the sociology masters program requires a bachelor’s degree in sociology or its equivalent, a GPA of 3.0 or higher on the last 60 semester credit hours of undergraduate work and on all graduate work, along with a personal statement of interest (2-3 pages) and two letters of recommendation. Students without a bachelor’s degree in sociology will be considered if the admission committee believes that the student shows academic promise.

Doctor of Philosophy in Sociology

Admission to the doctoral program in sociology requires a bachelor’s degree in sociology or its equivalent, GRE, a GPA of 3.5 or higher on the last 60 semester credit hours of undergraduate courses and on all graduate courses, three letters of recommendation, and a personal statement of interest (2-3 pages). Students without a bachelor’s degree in sociology will be considered if the admission committee believes that the student shows academic promise. International students must have a satisfactory score on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

The applicant who has a GPA of at least 3.0 but meets other conditions above may be considered for conditional admission. Additional coursework may be required. The admission committee may request additional evidence of the applicant’s ability to do graduate work.

Students admitted with a bachelor’s degree can earn their M.A. degree during the course of study. They will be required to write a Master’s thesis, which, together with their coursework, will be evaluated by the sociology faculty at the end of their Master’s stage. Based on the evaluation, the faculty could recommend that a student continue to pursue the Ph.D. degree or be awarded a terminal M.A. degree. The thesis requirement is waived for students admitted with a Master’s degree.

Students applying for admission to doctoral study must meet the general admission requirements of either the Graduate School at TWU (see admission section of this catalog) or the Toulouse School of Graduate Studies at UNT. Students additionally must apply to the sociology program (see departmental handbook or guidelines for details). Applications of students who satisfy the Graduate School’s admission standards are forwarded for review to the department admissions committee. This committee is responsible for recommending acceptance into the Federation doctoral program.

Master of Social Work

Applicants to the Joint MSW must meet the general admissions requirements of the Graduate Schools at UNT and TWU. Admission to the “Advanced Standing” program of study, completed in one academic year, requires an earned Bachelor’s of Social Work (BSW) degree within the last seven years. Admission to the  “Generalist” program, completed in two years, is available for graduates of other bachelor’s degrees, as well as BSW graduates with degrees more than seven years old. The GPA must be 3.0 or higher.  For more information, please visit the TWU Social Work webpage at https://twu.edu/social-work/ .

Students may minor in sociology at both the master’s and the doctoral levels. Courses designed to complement the student’s major field will be selected in consultation between the student and his/her advisory committee. Normally a minor in sociology requires 6 semester credit hours at the master’s level and 12 semester credit hours at the doctoral level.

Sociology Courses

SOCI 5113. Statistical Methods in Sociology. Introduction to conceptualization, operationalization, and measurement in the social sciences. Use of elementary measures of central tendency and dispersion, cross-tabulation, and linear modeling procedures to evaluate relationships among variables; problems of description and inference. Includes use of the SPSS statistical software package and secondary analysis of data. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 5313. Research Methods and Design. Social science research methods for sociologists. Emphasis on qualitative and quantitative methods, research design, and development of a research proposal. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 5353. Methods of Teaching Sociology. Discusses issues and problems in college education and in teaching sociology. Gives students practice in organizing sociology courses, constructing syllabi, teaching units, test construction, and utilization of available resources in sociology. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 5373. Theories in Social Psychology. Major schools of thought about the nature of the person as affected by society, including structural, symbolic interactionist, phenomenological, and critical schools. May be repeated for credit. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 5473. Foundations of Classical Sociological Theories. Introduction to classical sociological theory including major theorists such as Marx, Weber, and Durkheim. Focus on intellectual biographies of major sociologists. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 5483. Foundations of Contemporary Sociological Theories. Introduction to contemporary sociological theory including theorists such as Parsons, Goffman, and Giddens. Focus on intellectual biographies of the major sociologists. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 5643. Race and Ethnic Groups in the United States. Emphasis on selected groups (African Americans, Mexican Americans, and Asian Americans), their history, heritage, contributions to society, similarities, and differences. Application of theory and research to current intergroup relations. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 5733. Medical Sociology. Utilizes a cross-disciplinary systems approach to study the effects of social change on the individual, professional groups (changing roles), and medical institutions. Broad range of topics adjusted to meet needs of students enrolled. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 5843. Feminist Theories. Thoroughly explores feminist critical inquiry, focusing on particular theoretical issues, historical writings, and/or disciplinary contexts within the diverse body of scholarship of feminist theory. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 5903. Special Topics. Seminars on sociological theory, research methods, or selected substantive areas. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 5911. Independent Study. Individual study of topics in sociological theory, research, or in substantive areas selected in accordance with student's interests and needs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Credit: One hour.

SOCI 5913. Independent Study. Individual study of topics in sociological theory, research, or in substantive areas selected in accordance with student's interests and needs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 5953. Internship. Cooperative work-study arrangement between the University and business, industry, or selected institutions. No more than three credit hours counted toward degree. Pass-fail grade only. Thirteen practicum hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 5983. Thesis. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 5993. Thesis. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6123. Advanced Classical Sociological Theories. Analysis of classical sociological theory including major theorists such as Marx, Comte, Spencer, Weber, Durkheim, Simmel, Tonnies, and Park. Focus on intellectual biographies and projects of the founders of sociology. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6133. Advanced Contemporary Sociological Theories. Analysis of contemporary sociological theory including theorists such as Parsons, Goffman, Habermas, Bourdieu, Coleman, Levi-Strauss, Blumer, and Giddens. Focus on intellectual biographies and projects of the major contemporary sociologists. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6203. Seminar on Research Methods. Theory and application of quantitative and non-quantitative methods to sociological data. Suggested topics may include: use of available data; qualitative and field techniques; data analysis; techniques of sociological measurement. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisites: A course in statistics and one in basic research design. or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6321. Pro Seminar in Sociology. Prepares students for scholarly and professional work. Orients student to program and university requirements, mission, and scope. Facilitates professional socialization of the student. Required of all doctoral students. To be taken within the first year of graduate work. Pass/fail. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

SOCI 6363. Intermediate Social Statistics. Emphasis on application of appropriate statistical techniques for social data analysis, including ANOVA; techniques of linear regression and diagnostics; and measures of association. Training for carrying out a quantitative research project using sociological data. Prerequisite: Graduate level introduction to social statistics or equivalent. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6373. Quantitative Methods and Design. Advanced study of quantitative research methods for research in sociology. Advanced topics in survey research methods and design, and experimental methods and design. Preparation of quantitative research proposal. Prerequisites: Masters level social research methods course, and doctoral standing. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6383. Advanced Statistical Methods. Statistical techniques beyond the intermediate level including two-stage least squares regression, multinomial logistic regression, ordinal regression, loglinear analysis, factor analysis, path analysis, structural equation modeling, multilevel analysis/hierarchical linear model, and event history analysis/survival analysis. Application of techniques to social science research. Prerequisite: SOCI 6363 or equivalent, or instructor permission. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6503. Seminar on Social Organization and Disorganization. An analysis of selected topics in such areas as the development of social institutions, the bases of social differentiation and integration, and deviant behavior. Suggested topics may include: the sources of social change; societal integration and social control; comparative social structures; small group studies. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: A minimum of twelve semester hours in sociology or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6513. Global and Comparative Sociology. Theoretical and empirical literature in global and comparative sociology; examination of classical and contemporary theories, methods, and current issues in comparative-historical sociology and globalization. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6523. Social Psychology Theory. Classical and contemporary literature in sociological social psychology theory. Examines interactionist theories, social structure and personality, and sociological theories of group processes. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6553. Social Stratification. Advanced theoretical and empirical literature in social stratification. Review of classical and contemporary literature. Social inequality, social ranking systems, and the relationship of stratification theory and research techniques. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6723. Sociology of Terrorism. Critical analysis of organizational, instrumental, and cultural theories of terrorism. Transnational and global varieties of terrorism and secular and religious sources of the phenomenon. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6733. Health and Illness. Advanced conceptual and substantive overview of the field of medical sociology, utilizing a critical approach to health and illness. Medical and sociological models of illness, medical institutions, and social epidemiology. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6813. Criminology Theories. History, evolution, and current status of classical and contemporary theories of crime and deviance. Conceptual, logical, and empirical assessment of major theories. Theory construction and empirical testing. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6823. Globalization, Crime, and Justice. Globalization and its impact on crime and criminal justice systems explored through theoretical and empirical literature. Global mobility, global risk, and state responses to crime. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6833. Comparative Criminology. Transnational crime and justice processes and policy explored through theoretical and empirical literature. Transnational crime, globalization and crime, methods and data, and comparative justice systems. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6843. Deviant Behavior. Theory, research, and classical and contemporary literature on the sociology of deviance and social control. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6853. Contemporary Criminology. Contemporary issues in criminology including criminological epistemology, developments in theory and methodology, globalization, and global governance. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6873. Race, Crime, and Justice. Analysis and evaluation of the relationships between race and crime. Consideration of segregation and crime, hate crimes, and race and the criminal justice system. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6903. Special Topics. Seminars on sociological theory, research methods, or selected substantive areas. May be repeated for credit when topics vary. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6911. Independent Study. Advanced individual study of topics in sociological theory, research, or in substantive areas selected in accordance with student's interests and needs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Credit: One hour.

SOCI 6913. Independent Study. Advanced individual study of topics in sociological theory, research, or in substantive areas selected in accordance with student's interests and needs. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6923. Individual Research. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6983. Dissertation. Credit: Three hours.

SOCI 6993. Dissertation. Credit: Three hours.

Social Work Courses

SOWK 5103. Human Behavior in the Social Environment I. Examines the dynamics of human behavior in society, families and groups, from a wide range of perspectives including biological, psychological, systems and social/environmental. With an emphasis on strengths, focuses on developmental theories and practical knowledge covering populations from birth to young adulthood. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5113. Human Behavior in the Social Environment II. Analyzes bio-psycho-social developmental theories and practical knowledge of people from young adulthood to end of life. Concentrates upon a strengths-oriented perspective of diversity issues impacting individuals, families, groups and society, including race, gender, sexual orientation, class, culture, age and others, and the oppression of minorities and populations at risk. Prerequisite: SOWK 5103. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5203. Social Work Practice I: Individuals and Systems. Promotes competence in micro practice skills with individuals. Covers engagement at each stage of the intervention process. Focuses on solution focused, cognitive behavioral and task-centered approaches. Introduction to assessment of individuals in family and environmental contexts. Prerequisite: Admission to the MSW program. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5213. Social Work Practice II: Organizations and Communities. Focuses on macro community practice at the foundation level. Integration of theory, skills and techniques in order to intervene with groups, organizations, communities and advance social, economic and environmental justice. Emphasis on strengths-based approaches and participatory models which empower communities. Prerequisite: Admission to the MSW program. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5223. Social Work Practice III: Groups. Focuses on developing knowledge, skills and competency in facilitating small groups in a variety of practice settings. Covers theoretical approaches, each stage of the group process, including group dynamics and impact of member characteristics. Analyzes ethics and confidentiality issues in relation to group practice. Experiential learning includes role-playing and simulation exercises. Prerequisites: SOWK 5203 and SOWK 5213. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5233. Social Work Advanced Practice I. Focuses on biopsychosocial perspectives about mental health and disorders across the lifespan. Introduces major diagnostic classification systems with a primary focus on the Diagnostic Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Includes assessment skills and the diagnostic process utilizing the DSM. Emphasis upon facilitating a holistic multidimensional assessment inclusive of strengths. Analysis of diagnostic systems in relation to social work values and ethics. Prerequisite: Admission to the MSW program. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5243. Social Work Human Diversity and Multicultural Practice. Analysis of human diversity in the context of social work practice. Addresses related theoretical frameworks and the negative impact of power, privilege, oppression, and stigma upon diverse individuals and groups. Promotes knowledge and skill development to work effectively with diverse populations and protect human and civil rights. Enhances self-awareness to increase sensitive practice. Prerequisite: Admission to the MSW program. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5253. Social Work Advanced Practice II Interventions. Advanced practice course that builds on prior course work and presents theory and key practice models of evidence informed social work interventions with diverse individuals and families. Focuses on engagement at each stage of the intervention process. Experiential learning includes participating in case simulations and other exercises. Prerequisite: SOWK 5233. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5303. Social Work History and Social Welfare Policy. Examination of the historical and current development of the social work profession and US social welfare delivery system. Critical analysis of social problems and policy and service responses. Emphasis upon the mutual relationships among policy, practice and research. Investigation of the impact of social policy upon diverse and vulnerable groups. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5313. Social Work Policy Practice. Introduces foundational knowledge and skills in policy practice, including the policy making process and intervention techniques aimed at impacting and changing social welfare and public policies. Analysis of contemporary social issues, public policy and social welfare programs. Examination of global influences that affect US social policy. Prerequisite: SOWK 5303. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5323. Social Work Administration and Management. Addresses administration and management leadership across a variety of human service settings with an emphasis on managing competing and limited resources. Examines organizational theory and knowledge and skills for effective administration and management including planning, supervision, developing agency policy and procedure, working with boards, budgeting, fund raising and grant writing. Prerequisite: Admission to the MSW program.Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5333. Social Work Advanced Policy Analysis. Builds upon policy practice skills and knowledge and macro community practice techniques. Presents frameworks for policy research and analysis. Advanced analysis and critique of social welfare policies that affect families and diverse and oppressed populations. Advocacy and intervention techniques aimed at positively impacting social welfare and public policies. Focus upon legislative research and written and verbal persuasion skills. Prerequisite: SOWK 5323. Three lecture hours a week.

SOWK 5403. Social Work Research Methods. Covers foundational concepts, principles, and methods of scientific inquiry, focusing on quantitative and qualitative designs and analysis and use of existing research in practice and policy. Examines evidence-based practice as a process of inquiry. Explores cultural and ethical considerations and the role of research in advocating for under-served and special populations. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5413. Social Work Program and Practice Evaluation. Builds upon quantitative and qualitative methods and analysis in order to gain knowledge and skills about practice and program accountability and effectiveness. Focuses upon evaluation of social work practice and programs including single system design, needs assessments, and process and outcome evaluation. Covers use of logic model in program design and evaluation. Prerequisite: Admission to the MSW program. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5503. Death, Dying and Bereavement I. Examines services for individuals and families experiencing end-of-life issues and addresses concepts and skills for effective practice in a variety of settings. Integration of theory, research and practice in relation to grief processes. Exploration of societal and cultural factors in the practice context. Application of ethical and legal issues to practice. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5513. Practice in Mental Health. Presents theory and methods of assessment and intervention for working with persons with diagnosed serious mental illness with an emphasis upon recovery-oriented evidence informed practices. Explores complex legal and ethical issues. Analysis of cultural and gender appropriate methods which promote social justice and human rights. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5533. Theories and Interventions With Children. Focuses on theory and interventions with children and parents with an emphasis upon attachment, development, ecosystems, trauma and cultural context. Covers practice with children individually and in groups, parent/child dyad approaches, and family interventions. Demonstrates expressive therapies and parent/child art therapy techniques. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5543. Child Maltreatment: Assessment and Intervention. Addresses theory and research of the etiology and developmental consequences of child maltreatment. Analyses the dynamics of child physical abuse, sexual abuse, psychological maltreatment, neglect and indicators of risk. Covers evidence informed assessment and interventions. Explores the effects of child abuse and neglect across the lifespan. Prerequisite: SOWK 5233. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5553. Foster Care, Adoption and Permanency Planning. Focuses on engagement, assessment and intervention with children who are in foster care, adoption and/or permanency planning in public, tribal or private child welfare systems. Covers key social work, legal and judicial processes from each domain. Addresses implementation of the Indian Child Welfare Act. Explores themes of attachment, identify, grief and loss. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5803. Social Work Foundation Field Seminar and Field Practicum I. The seminar facilitates integration of foundation field practicum and classroom learning through processing and discussion of field issues and situations. Students gain knowledge of and apply models of critical reflective practice, effective use of supervision, and ethical decision making. Includes a supervised social work field practicum in a community agency or program related to current course work. Application to field practicum required. Practice experience and demonstration of foundation social work skills in an applied setting. Requires a minimum of 200 clock hours at the agency. Prerequisites: Acceptance into practicum and satisfactory completion of SOWK 5103, SOWK 5203, SOWK 5213, SOWK 5303, and SOWK 5403. Co-requisites: SOWK 5113, SOWK 5223, and SOWK 5313. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5813. Social Work Foundation Field Seminar and Field Practicum II. The seminar facilitates integration of foundation field practicum and all foundation level classroom learning through processing and discussion of field issues and situations. Students gain knowledge of and apply evaluation of practice. Includes practice in a community agency or program related to current course work, which is a supervised social work field practicum in an agency setting. Practice experience and demonstration of foundation social work skills in an applied setting. Requires a minimum of 200 clock hours at the agency. Prerequisites: SOWK 5803. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5833. Social Work Advanced Field Seminar and Field Practicum I. The seminar facilitates integration of advanced field practicum and classroom learning through processing and discussion of field issues and situations. Assignments based upon advanced field social work topics. Supervised social work field practicum in an agency setting. Includes practice in a community agency or program related to current course work. Practice and demonstration of advanced year social work skills in an applied setting. Requires a minimum of 250 clock hours in the agency. Prerequisite: Acceptance into practicum and permission of instructor. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5843. Social Work Advanced Field Seminar and Field Practicum II. The seminar facilitates integration of advanced field practicum and classroom learning through processing and discussion of field issues and situations. Assignments based upon advanced field social work topics. Supervised social work field practicum in an agency setting. Includes practice in a community agency or program related to current course work. Practice and demonstration of advanced year social work skills in an applied setting. Requires a minimum of 250 clock hours in the agency. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor and satisfactory completion of SOWK 5233, SOWK 5323, SOWK 5413, and SOWK 5833. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5911. Independent Study. Independent or tutorial work in selected areas of social work. Prerequisite: Permission of the department. Credit: One hour.

SOWK 5912. Independent Study. Independent or tutorial work in selected areas of social work. Prerequisite: Permission of the department. Credit: Two hours.

SOWK 5913. Independent Study. Independent or tutorial work in selected areas of social work. Prerequisite: Permission of the department. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5973. Advanced Integrative Seminar. Advanced seminar course in which students integrate concepts from across the curriculum and demonstrate cumulative knowledge gained from all areas of the program in one focused assignment, within the context of the student's chosen concentration. Required of all non-thesis students in their final semester of coursework. Prerequisite: SOWK 5833. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5983. Thesis. Open to students who chose the thesis option. Independent, applied research that addresses a significant issue in social work supervised by a member of the joint social work graduate faculty. Prerequisite: Permission of the department. Credit: Three hours.

SOWK 5993. Thesis. Open to students who chose the thesis option. Independent, applied research that addresses a significant issue in social work supervised by a member of the joint social work graduate faculty. Prerequisite: Permission of the department. Credit: Three hours.

Professors

KAPINUS, CAROLYN, Professor of Sociology; Dean of the Graduate School. B.A., Centenary College of Louisiana; M.A., Texas Tech University; Ph.D.,The Pennsylvania State University.
LO, CELIA, Professor of Sociology; Chair of the Department of Sociology and Social Work. B.S., Hong Kong Shue Yan University; M.A., University of Alabama; Ph.D., University of Alabama.
SADRI, MAHMOUD, Professor of Sociology. B.A., University of Teheran : Teheran, Iran; M.A., University of Teheran : Teheran, Iran; Ph.D., New School for Social Research.
WILLIAMS, JAMES L., Professor of Sociology. B.A., University of Georgia; M.A., University of Georgia; M.A.Ed., Western Carolina University; Ph.D., University of Georgia.
YANG, PHILIP Q., Professor of Sociology. B.A., Zhongshan University : China; M.A., University of California, Los Angeles; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles.

Associate Professors

GULLION, JESSICA S., Associate Professor of Sociology. B.A., Texas Tech University; M.A., Southwest Texas State University; Ph.D., Texas Woman's University.
TILTON, ABIGAIL C., Associate Professor of Social Work; Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. B.S.W., University of North Texas; M.S.S.W., University of Texas at Arlington; Ph.D., University of North Texas.

Assistant Professor

BONES, PAUL D.C., Assistant Professor of Sociology. B.A., University of Oklahoma; M.A., University of Oklahoma; Ph.D., University of Oklahoma.