Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences

http://www.twu.edu/nutrition-food-sciences/

Chair: K. Shane Broughton, PhD
Location: OMB 307 (Denton)
Phone: 940-898-2636
Fax: 940-898-2634
E-mail: Denton: nutrfdsci@twu.edu

Location: IHSH 7118 (Houston)
Phone: 713-794-2371
Fax: 713-794-2374
E-mail: Houston: nfs-houston@twu.edu

Undergraduate Degrees Offered

The academic programs in nutrition and food science provide opportunities for education in both liberal arts and sciences and fields of professional specialization such as medicine. Students take courses in nutrition, food science, food service management, chemistry, physiology, mathematics, and business. Graduates are prepared for careers in clinical dietetics, foodservice systems management, food industry sales or research, health and wellness programs, culinary science, community nutrition and public health, or consultation and private practice.

  • B.A.S. in Culinary Science and Food Service Management degree is approved by the Research Chef Association and builds upon the Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) in Culinary Arts degree (state and SACS approved) to fulfill the growing demand for executive chefs, food service management specialists, quality assurance and regulator managers, and food scientists. Students in this program will focus on applying their culinary knowledge to nutrition, food science, and research methods.
  • B.S. in Food and Nutrition in Business and Industry program provides students with a background in both food and nutrition. Graduates may seek employment in aspects of food or nutrition, particularly in quality control and quality assurance, food product development, foodservice management, food and nutrition management software, sales, marketing, food safety, or research. Minor required.
  • B.S. in Nutrition (Dietetics) program is a Didactic Program in Dietetics (DPD) which is an accredited program for students who are preparing to become Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (RDNs) to work in hospitals, HMOs, private practice, outpatient clinics, or other healthcare facilities, community and public health settings, schools, foodservice administration positions, government agencies, pharmaceutical companies, and in academia and research. This program is an application-only process.
  • B.S. in Nutrition (Nutritional Sciences) program emphasizes basic sciences and is ideal for students who are interested in careers in academia and research in nutritional sciences or who plan to seek admission to professional studies in medicine, physician assistant, dentistry, physical therapy, occupational therapy, pharmacy, or the veterinary professions. The degree provides a foundation for further education at the master's and doctoral levels for the pursuit of careers in industry, research, and university level teaching positions. The program includes courses in nutrition, biology, chemistry, and mathematics.
  • B.S. in Nutrition (Wellness) program provides students with the nutritional knowledge to assist others in reducing the risk of chronic disease through educational and behavioral approaches with courses in nutrition and health studies. Graduates seek employment in health education, community health, school health, corporate wellness, insurance companies, and fitness centers. Studies focus on qualifying students to obtain the Certified Health Education Specialist certification (CHES) often required for positions in public health.

Teacher Certification in Hospitality, Nutrition, and Food Science

Students majoring in either B.S. in Nutrition (Dietetics) or B.S. in Food and Nutrition in Business and Industry may receive teacher certification to teach Hospitality, Nutrition, and Food Science in Texas schools, grades 8-12, by completing 20 semester credit hours of education courses, 20 semester credit hours of family science courses, and 8 semester credit hours of related studies. See the Family Sciences section of this catalog for more information.

Graduate Courses

In addition to undergraduate programs, the department offers a dietetic internship/master’s program at both Denton and Houston. Graduate degrees are available in nutrition, food science, and food systems administration. The department also participates in interdisciplinary master’s degrees. Please refer to the Graduate Catalog for information regarding graduate courses.

All students must meet the University requirements as outlined in the Admissions section of this catalog.

Students interested in the B.S. in Nutrition (Dietetics) DPD program must meet the additional admission requirements as outlined on the Bachelor of Science in Nutrition (Dietetics) catalog page.

Courses

NFS 1301. Food Preparation Principles Laboratory. (TCCN HECO 1315) Laboratory experience in food preparation. Co-requisite: NFS 1302. Three laboratory hours a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 1302. Food Preparation Principles. (TCCN HECO 1315) Application of nutrition knowledge and basic scientific principles of meal management, selection, preparation, and safety of food. Co-requisite: NFS 1301. Two lecture hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

NFS 2011. Introduction to Dietetics. Introduction to the field of dietetics including history of the profession, education, preparation, roles and responsibilities of dietetic practitioners, exploration of practice settings, ethics of professional conduct, professionalism, evidence-based practice, and internship program requirements. Prerequisite: Majors in Nutrition with an emphasis in Dietetics. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 2031. Food Microbiology Laboratory. Evaluations of microorganisms as spoilage agents in foods. Preservation techniques to retard microbial spoilage. Foods which require microbial fermentations in their processing procedures; conditions which result in "food-borne" illnesses. Prerequisites: BIOL 1113 and BIOL 1111. Three laboratory hours a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 2033. Food Microbiology. Microbial diversity and environmental interactions with emphasis on organisms found in fresh and spoiled foods. Contamination, preservation methods, and spoilage mechanisms of different foods. Effects of microbial enzymes on foods. Food sanitation, control, and inspection; and food-related illnesses. Prerequisites: BIOL 1113 and BIOL 1111. Co-requisite: NFS 2031. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 2323. Introduction to Nutrition. (TCCN HECO 1322, BIOL 1322) Principles of normal nutrition including study of the major nutrients, their interrelationships, and their role in health. Recommended prerequisite: One semester of chemistry or physiology. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 2343. Nutritional Management for the Family And Child. Applications of principles of food and nutrition to the family and child. Study of nutritional needs of the social, cultural, economic, and governmental factors which influence the health and welfare of family members. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 3033. Nutrition throughout the Life Cycle. Relationship of nutritional requirements to the stages of the life cycle from conception through aging. Prerequisite: NFS 2323 or NFS 2013. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 3041. Food Protection Management. Identification of causes of foodborne disease. Application of control measures to prevent food safety problems according to HACCP (Hazard Analysis Critical Control Point) principles. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hours.

NFS 3043. Community Nutrition. Identification of nutritional problems and resources available in the community. Management of nutrition services, provision of nutrition information/education to the public, and the legislative process. Prerequisite: NFS 2323 or NFS 2013. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 3063. Ecology of Foods and Nutrition. Discussion of factors which affect choice of foods. Examination of the interaction of cultural, socioeconomic, political, physiological, and ecological factors that impact food availability, consumption, and ultimately nutritional status on global basis. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 3073. Nutrition for Women in a Global Environment. Application of nutrition principles to promote health in women throughout the life cycle nationally and globally. Emphasis on nutrition to maintain health and reduce risk of obesity, osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and diabetes in women of different ethnic and cultural backgrounds. Three lecture hours a week. Creidt: Three hours.

NFS 3081. Principles of Culinary Science. Applications of basic mathematics concepts, general principles of science, and information technology to develop new products; to describe and analyze basic food and food systems; and to determine the objective and subjective properties of food and food ingredients. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 3083. Bionutrition. Fundamental principles of biochemistry for nutrition, covering protein, carbohydrate, fat, vitamin, and engery metabolism; underlying causes and rationale for the prevention and treatment of diseases. Prerequisites: NFS 2323; and CHEM 1023 and CHEM 1021, or CHEM 2213 and CHEM 2211. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 3101. Advanced Nutrition Laboratory. Laboratory experience in assessing nutritional status and nutrients in food. Three laboratory hours a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 3163. Sports Nutrition. Physiological effects of exercise and nutrition upon the human body. Current topics of interest, current research, and their relationship to athletic performance. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 3173. Culture and Food. Study of influence of culture on food habits in various countries and the accompanying health effects. Evolution of cultural food habits are related to nationality, ethnicity, religion, and the changing role of women. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 3201. Nutrition Assessment. Principles and techniques of assessing nutritional status and the development of nutrition care plans. Prerequisite: NFS 3083. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 3321. Food Science Laboratory. Introduction to the techniques of food processing and preparation, food analysis, and new product development. Co-requisite: NFS 3323. Three laboratory hours a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 3323. Food Science. Application of chemical and physical properties of basic food ingredients; major processing and preservation principles and application of science technology to various food products. Sensory evaluation of foods. Emphasis on current topics of the national and local food industry. Prerequisites: NFS 1301, NFS 1302, CHEM 1013, and CHEM 1023. Co-requisite: NFS 3321. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 3713. Quantity Food Production and Service. Principles of food preparation, food safety, and quality improvement applied to quantity food production and service; institutional menu planning, production planning, and cost determination; food purchasing; marketing theory and materials management for foodservice systems. Prerequisites: NFS 1301 and NFS 1302, or equivalent; NFS 2323; and NFS 2033 or equivalent. Co-requisite: NFS 3722. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 3722. Quantity Food Production and Service Laboratory. Supervised experiences in quantity food production and service. Co-requisite: NFS 3713. Six laboratory hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

NFS 4023. Food Product Development. Group and individual experiments in development of new food products; objective and sensory evaluation of the effects of varying the type and amount of ingredients and methods of preparation on the quality of the finished product. Prerequisite: NFS 3323. Two lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 4031. Culinary Nutrition Modification Lab. Application of culinary techniques, food science, and nutrition to development and modification of menus and recipes for healthcare. Sensory evaluation of modified recipes. Prerequisite: NFS 2323. Co-requisite: NFS 4032. Three laboratory hours a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 4032. Culinary Nutrition Modification. Medical nutrition therapy, menu planning, and recipe modification for healthcare. Prerequisite: NFS 2323. Co-requisite: NFS 4031. Two lecture hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

NFS 4103. Medical Nutrition Therapy I. Concepts of appropriate therapeutic nutrition as applied in the treatment of human disease. Prerequisites: NFS 3033, NFS 3083, and NFS 3201. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: NFS 4303 or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 4113. Medical Nutrition Therapy II. Concepts of appropriate therapeutic nutrition as applied in the treatment of human disease. Prerequisites: NFS 3033, NFS 3083, and NFS 3201. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: NFS 4303 or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 4123. Sensory Evaluation of Food. The anatomy, physiology, and functions of human senses used to evaluate the sensory qualities of foods and food ingredients. Application of sensory evaluation methods to asses qualities of foods including taste, texture, appearance, and flavor. Use of experimental designs and statistical tests necessary to analyze and present sensory evaluation data. Prerequisite: NFS 3081. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 4301. Principles of Nutritional Genomics. Advanced study of fundamental concepts of nutrient-gene interaction in human health and disease. Prerequisites: NFS 2323 and NFS 3083. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 4303. Advanced Nutrition: Macronutrients. Fundamental principles of biochemistry for nutrition, covering carbohydrate, fat, protein, and energy metabolism; underlying causes and rationale for the prevention and treatment of diseases. Prerequisites: NFS 2323, NFS 3083, ZOOL 2031, and ZOOL 2033. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 4313. Advanced Nutrition: Micronutrients. Advanced study of fundamental concepts of micronutrients as related to both the chemistry and physiology of the human body. Prerequisites: NFS 2323, NFS 3083, ZOOL 2031, and ZOOL 2033. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 4473. Nutrition Therapy and Education Methods. Principles and techniques of therapy and educational methods applied to nutrition and foodservice management, communication skills, and evaluation methods. Enroll during final fall semester. Co-requisite: NFS 4103 or NFS 4113. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 4501. Careers in Food and Nutrition. Career options in food and nutrition such as food service management, product development, healthcare, and agriculture. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 4503. Food Processing and Unit Operations. Principles and practices of today's food processing industry; procedures for processing and manufacturing various foods for retail sale. Prerequisites: NFS 2033, NFS 3081, and NFS 3323. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 4601. Literature in Nutrition and Food Science Seminar. Student presentations based on library or laboratory research projects. May be repeated for a total of three credits. Prerequisite: NFS 2323 or equivalent; or permission of the instructor. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 4701. Dietetics As a Profession. A discussion of the professional responsibilities of the dietitian with emphasis on nontraditional careers; AND's organization and structure; routes to registration, and the application process for internship. Enroll during final fall semester. Co-reqisite: NFS 4103 or NFS 4113. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 4744. Principles of Foodservice Systems. Management principles, strategic management, risk management, layout evaluation and equipment selection, human resources management, and financial management of foodservice systems. Prerequisites: NFS 3713 and NFS 3722, or equivalent. Four lecture hours a week. Credit: Four hours.

NFS 4901. Special Topics. Specially scheduled course on topic of current interest. May be repeated for additional credit. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 4903. Special Topics. Specially scheduled course on topic of current interest. May be repeated for additional credit. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 4911. Independent Study. Intensive study of a topic of individual or professional interest in nutrition and food sciences. Credit: One hour.

NFS 4913. Independent Study. Intensive study of a topic of individual or professional interest in nutrition and food sciences. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 4941. Current Topics in Nutrition and Food Sciences. An in-depth examination of topics of current interest in the area of nutrition or food science. Prerequisites: NFS 1302 and NFS 1301, or NFS 2323. May be repeated for credit. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 4943. Trends and Controversies in Nutrition and Food Sciences. An in-depth examination of recent research on topics of current interest such as food safety, role of nutrients in cancer prevention, and nutrition policy. Prerequisite: NFS 2323 or equivalent. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 4953. Cooperative Education. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 4956. Cooperative Education. Credit: Six hours.

NFS 4983. Research in Nutrition and Food Sciences. Participate in ongoing projects of faculty. May be repeated once. Prerequisites: CHEM 1023, NFS 4302, NFS 4303, NFS 4601, and permission of the department chair. Nine laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

Professors

BROUGHTON, KENNETH SHANE, Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences; Chair of the Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences; Interim Chair of Biology. B.S, Colorado State University; M.S., Washington State University; Ph.D., Washington State University.
DIMARCO, NANCY M., Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.A., University of Colorado, Boulder; M.S., Iowa State University; Ph.D., Iowa State University.
IMRHAN, VICTORINE, Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., Texas Tech University; M.S., Louisiana Tech University; Ph.D., Texas Woman's University.
PRASAD, CHANDAN, Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology : Naini Tal, India; M.Sc., G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology : Naini Tal, India; Ph.D., Louisiana State University .
VIJAYAGOPAL, PARAKAT, Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., University of Kerala; M.S., Banaras Hindu University; Ph.D., University of Kerala.

Associate Professors

JUMA, SHANIL, Associate Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., Purdue University; M.S., University of Illinois, Chicago; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University.
MOORE, CAROLYN E., Associate Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., University of California, Berkeley; M.S., University of California, Berkeley; M.B.A., Rice University; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles.

Assistant Professors

LEMIEUX, MONIQUE J., Assistant Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., Christopher Newport University; M.S., The University of Tennessee Knoxville; Ph.D., Texas Tech University.
MAZIARZ, MINDY, Assistant Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., Texas A&M University; M.S., University of Alabama, Birmingham; Ph.D., Texas Woman's University.
WARREN, CYNTHIA A., Assistant Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., Texas A&M University; M.S., Texas A&M University; Ph.D., Texas A&M University .

Associate Clinical Professors

BUSH, ROSE MARY, Associate Clinical Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences; Dietetic Internship Program Director of the Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences : Houston. B.S., Grambling College; M.S., Louisiana Tech University.
KEARNEY, DOLORES E., Associate Clinical Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., State University of New York College at Oneonta; M.P.H., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
MORELAND, KAREN A., Associate Clinical Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., Southwest Texas State University; M.S., Texas Woman's University.
REW, MARTHA L., Associate Clinical Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., University of Southwestern Louisiana; M.S., Louisiana State University .

Visiting Assistant Clinical Professors

GRIFFIN, ANGELA D., Visiting Assistant Clinical Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., University of Central Arkansas; M.S., University of Central Arkansas.
STONER-DAVIS, KERSTINA L., Visiting Assistant Clinical Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., Kansas State University; M.S., Texas Woman's University.