School of Occupational Therapy

http://www.twu.edu/occupational-therapy/

Director: Cynthia Evetts, Associate Professor
Location: MCL 810
Phone: 940-898-2801
Fax: 940-898-2806
E-mail: ot@twu.edu

Associate Directors:

Denton (interim): Noralyn Pickens, Associate Professor
Phone: 940-898-2801

Dallas: Noralyn Pickens, Associate Professor
Phone: 214-689-7750

Houston: Patricia Bowyer, Professor
Phone: 713-794-2128

Graduate Degrees Offered

Occupational therapy is a health care profession whose members work to foster full participation in everyday life for persons with physical, cognitive, emotional, or societal restrictions. Occupational therapy is based on the premise that engagement in real life activities in prescribed areas with specific goals promotes health and wellness. The School of Occupational Therapy at Texas Woman’s University offers graduate level training and education for persons seeking to initiate or to expand a career in occupational therapy. The School is home to 25 faculty members and over 5,000 alumni and encompasses a Texas-wide network of professionals dedicated to the advancement of high quality evidence-based occupational therapy practice. The occupational therapy programs are available at the main campus of Texas Woman’s University in Denton, the T. Boone Pickens Institute of Health Sciences in Dallas, and the TWU Institute of Health Sciences in Houston. Specific online components supplement traditional classroom learning. At each location, courses are conducted in classrooms and laboratories specially equipped to enhance student learning. Lecture and laboratory learning experiences are provided by experienced occupational therapy faculty, occupational therapy practitioners, and other health care providers. TWU offers degree programs leading to the Master of Occupational Therapy, Doctor of Occupational Therapy, and Doctor of Philosophy in Occupational Therapy.

Overview of Degrees offered in Occupational Therapy

The Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT) degree is a professional entry-level degree that prepares students with baccalaureate degrees in other fields to become occupational therapists. The curriculum is taught in Denton, Dallas, and Houston. Master of Occupational Therapy students complete all courses at one of these sites.

The Master of Occupational Therapy program is accredited by the Accreditation Council of Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE, P.O. Box 31220, Bethesda, MD 20824-1220, 301-652-2682). With successful completion of the MOT degree, the student is eligible to apply for the certification examination given by the National Board for Certification of Occupational Therapy (www.nbcot.org). Note:  The National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) may bar persons from taking the certification examination for the following reasons: 1) felony conviction, 2) adverse action related to professional license, registration, or certification, 3) documented misconduct, and/or 4) suspension or expulsion from an institute of higher education. The School of Occupational Therapy recommends that students with questions concerning their eligibility to take this required examination to be credentialed as an occupational therapist, contact NBCOT for an “early determination review.”

The Doctor of Occupational Therapy (OTD) degree is a post professional clinical practice degree that engages practicing occupational therapists in leadership for advanced roles as master practitioner, advocate for client populations, and occupational therapy educator. The curriculum is designed to be experienced while active in the profession with learning activities integrated into clinical practice.  The program is structured for continuous part time enrollment utilizing distance education methods with periodic on-campus sessions.

The Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) degree is a post-professional graduate program for occupational therapists whose desire is to develop skills for advanced academic and research pursuits.  The PhD in Occupational Therapy is offered via on-line and on-campus learning experiences in Dallas and Houston.

Admission Requirements

Please see the admission section of this catalog. In addition to these general requirements, the School of Occupational Therapy requires the following.
 

Master of Occupational Therapy – applicants with a bachelor’s degree

Entry into the Master of Occupational Therapy program is structured for students who have completed specified undergraduate coursework and who hold a bachelor’s degree in any major from an accredited institution. The Master of Occupational Therapy program is a 28-month full-time educational commitment, inclusive of a six-month internship. Cohorts of 30-45 students are admitted each fall semester to each of our three locations.

Applicants must complete the following prerequisites with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better prior to beginning M.O.T. courses: statistics, human anatomy and physiology, developmental psychology, abnormal psychology, and medical terminology. Applicants must also complete a minimum of twenty hours of observation, volunteer, or paid employment under the supervision of a registered occupational therapist and submit an application and essay. 
 

TWU Alumni Advantage Application

Applicants requesting the Texas Woman’s University Alumni Advantage admission may apply the year prior to the completion of their degree. Applications must be postmarked by September 15 for consideration for entry in the subsequent fall semester. Applicants requesting Alumni Advantage must demonstrate an overall grade point average of 3.7 on the last 60 semester credit hours completed at the time of application, as well as a 3.5 grade point average on prerequisites and maintain these averages until the award of the undergraduate degree. Assured admission status will be revoked for applications not meeting this standard.

Please refer to the Undergraduate Catalog for a full description of the TWU Alumni Advantage program.

Doctor of Occupational Therapy

Admission requirements include

  1. Current occupational therapy license or registration
  2. Master level degree
  3. 3.2 minimum GPA on master level work
  4. Successful completion of the OTD application process inclusive of written application and interviews
  5. Faculty mentor agreement


Doctor of Philosophy

Admission requirements include

  1. master’s degree in occupational therapy or a related field; comparable graduate level degree may be substituted subject to review by doctoral admissions committee;
  2. minimum GPA of 3.2 in previous graduate work;
  3. submission of scores in verbal, and quantitative sections of the Graduate Record Exam;
  4. satisfactory English language proficiency score (if applicable);
  5. initial certification as an occupational therapist by NBCOT; and
  6. three letters of reference.

Graduates from non U.S. baccalaureate programs, recognized by the World Federation of Occupational Therapists who otherwise meet admission requirements, need not be certified by the NBCOT to pursue the Ph.D. in occupational therapy. Ph.D. applicants, who meet basic admission criteria, are asked to submit a written essay of no more than 1000 words addressing professional goals, prior experience that may form the foundation for doctoral work, and potential research directions. The doctoral admissions committee reviews the applicants and invites selected individuals for a personal interview with the committee. Year-round admission.

Courses

OT 5001. Appraising Occupational Therapy Evidence. Evaluation of clinical research evidence and its applicability to occupational therapy practice decisions. One seminar hour a week. Credit: One hour.

OT 5002. Applied Research Methods in Occupational Therapy. Qualitative and quantitative occupational therapy methods of scholarly inquiry. Emphasis on techniques to promote rigorous and valid research relevant to the study of occupation and domains of occupational therapy. Descriptive, correlation, inferential statistics, and basic qualitative coding strategies. Co-requisite: OT 5001. Two lecture hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

OT 5003. Clinical Neuroscience for Occupational Therapy. Relationship between occupational performance and neuroanatomy and physiology. Review of clinical cases that illustrate implications for occupational therapy intervention when disruption within the central and peripheral nervous system results in dysfunction. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 5022. Occupational Therapy Research Practicum. Participation in implementation of a faculty-sponsored project that is relevant to the practice of occupational therapy utilizing documented and referenced method of systematic inquiry. Collection and/or organization, analysis and/or preparation for dissemination of information according to the method of systematic inquiry designated in the work. May be repeated for credit. Credit: Two hours.

OT 5101. Professional Paper in Occupational Therapy. Completion of a professional paper in occupational therapy. Credit: One hour.

OT 5122. Occupation, Wellness, and Adaptation. Adaptation, wellness, and disability prevention models. Practice of occupational therapy in wellness and prevention programs. Two lecture hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

OT 5132. Persons, Tools, and Occupations. Introduction to the domain and process of occupational therapy including emphasis on the purposes and meanings of occupation, documentation of observations, analysis of activities, and occupational profiles. Practical application of play, games, crafts, and other appropriate activities in individual and group settings. One lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

OT 5142. Scholarly Inquiry in Occupational Therapy. Principles of scholarly activity, research, and research evidence in the development of a science-based body of knowledge to ground the practice of occupational therapy. Criteria for evaluating research for application, research ethics, occupational therapy literature, and related resources including grants. Two lecture hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

OT 5163. Foundations of Occupational Therapy Practice. Foundations of occupation and occupational science over the course of the profession's history and in current practice, including scope, standards, theories, models, and ethics. Principles of occupational therapy practice, professional reasoning, and professional behaviors. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 5202. Professional Paper in Occupational Therapy. Participation in the implementation of a faculty-sponsored research endeavor relevant to the practice of occupational therapy utilizing documented and referenced method of systematic inquiry. Development of a research proposal; participation in the collection and/or organization and analysis of information according to the method of systematic inquiry designated in the work. Credit: Two hours.

OT 5232. Mental Health and Social Participation. Evaluation and intervention principles for psychosocial practice in clinical and in community settings. Principles and practice of group process and interventions. One seminar and three laboratory hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

OT 5322. Occupational Performance and Adaptation in Infancy and Childhood Laboratory. Performance of evaluation, intervention, and outcome measures consistent with developmental level for infants and children with pediatric conditions and/or congenital anomalies. Practice in selection, implementation, analysis, and grading of interventions appropriate to infants and children. One seminar and three laboratory hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

OT 5352. Evaluation Processes in Occupational Therapy. Identification, selection, and analysis of occupational therapy assessments. Measurement interpretation based on client needs, contextual factors, and psychometric properties. One lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

OT 5512. Movement in Context. Occupational therapy assessment of the musculoskeletal system, mechanical principles, clinical conditions for biomechanical intervention and treatment planning for occupational performance issues related to strength, range of motion, endurance, and tissue integrity. One lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

OT 5522. Occupational Adaptation: Early to Middle Adulthood Laboratory. Performance of evaluation, intervention, and outcome measures for early and middle adult clients with acquired disorders interfering with occupational performance, including musculoskeletal, neurological, and general medical conditions as a result of illness or injury. One lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

OT 5553. Occupational Participation in Early to Middle Adulthood. Conditions that impact occupational participation in early and middle adulthood. Occupational therapy theory and evidence-based evaluation, intervention, outcome measures, and service delivery appropriate for this population. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 5563. Occupational Participation in Middle to Late Adulthood. Conditions that impact adaptation and participation in occupations and roles for middle to older adults including disability, illness, and chronic impairment. Theory and evidence-based occupational therapy evaluation, intervention, outcome measures, and service delivery appropriate for this population. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 5573. Occupational Participation in Infancy And Childhood. Conditions that impact occupational participation for infants and children including medical, educational, and psychosocial problems of developmental, or acquired origin. Theory and evidence-based occupational therapy evaluation, intervention, outcome measures, and service delivery for this population. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 5722. Occupational Performance and Adaptation In Middle to Late Adulthood Laboratory. Performance of evaluation, intervention, and outcome measures appropriate for middle and older adults with disorders interfering with occupational performance. Practice in selection, implementation, analysis, and grading of interventions appropriate to middle and older adults. One lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

OT 5732. Assistive and Computer Technology Tools in Practice. Exploration of the uses of assistive technology in everyday life, including environmental modifications for home and work. Practice in the use of powered mobility, environmental controls, driver rehabilitation, and application of computer and assistive technology for specific populations. One lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

OT 5753. Designing, Evaluating, and Managing Systems. Occupational therapy program design, principles of management, and factors influencing current health care policy. Application of principles of management to service models and health care settings, health care teams, implementation of federal and state regulation, and reimbursement systems. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 5811. Specialty Field Experience. One-week elective placement in a specialty setting with adjunct, full-time, or clinical specialist faculty. May be related to special interest or to research project. May also be in a professional administrative setting as a national or state office. In special cases may be supervised by professionals in other disciplines. May be repeated for credit. Forty practicum hours. Credit: One hour.

OT 5812. Issues in Knowledge Bases. Current issues in theoretical concepts of knowledge bases in occupational therapy. May be repeated for credit. Two lecture hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

OT 5813. Specialty Field Experience. Three-week elective placement in a specialty setting with adjunct, full-time, or clinical specialist faculty. May be related to special interest or to research project. May also be in a professional administrative setting as a national or state office. In special cases may be supervised by professionals in other disciplines. May be repeated for credit. One hundred twenty practicum hours. Credit: Three hours.

OT 5816. Specialty Field Experience. Six-week elective placement in a specialty setting with adjunct, full-time, or clinical specialist faculty. May be related to special interest or to research project. May also be in a professional administrative setting as a national or state office. In special cases may be supervised by professionals in other disciplines. May be repeated for credit. Two hundred forty practicum hours. Credit: Six hours.

OT 5822. Issues in Adaptation. Current issues in occupational adaptation in occupational therapy. May be repeated for credit. Two lecture hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

OT 5823. Professional Reasoning and Fieldwork: Early to Middle Adulthood. Interpretation of selected evaluation and intervention procedures. Integration of knowledge about diagnoses and challenges experienced by individuals in daily occupations. Placement in occupational therapy practice settings under the supervision of an occupational therapy practitioner. Two seminar and two practicum (field experience) hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 5832. Issues in Practice Tools. Current issues in use of tools in occupational therapy. May be repeated for credit. Two lecture hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

OT 5833. Professional Reasoning and Fieldwork: Mental Health and Community-Based Programs. Emphasis on psychosocial aspects of health including promotion of well-being. Exploration of groups that facilitate engagement in a variety of occupations in context. Placement in community settings under supervision of a qualified professional or occupational therapy practitioner. Two seminar and two practicum (field experience) hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 5843. Professional Reasoning and Fieldwork: Older Adulthood. Examination of diagnoses and effects of aging on occupational performance. Placement under the supervision of an occupational therapy practitioner in practice settings with older adults engaged in social and productive activities. Two seminar and two practicum (field experience) hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 5852. Issues in Occupational Therapy Process. Current issues in occupational therapy processes. May be repeated for credit. Two lecture hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

OT 5853. Professional Reasoning and Fieldwork: Infancy, Childhood, and Adolescence. Analysis of children's occupational participation, performance, and adaptation in various contexts. Placement with occupational therapy practitioners in clinical and community settings for children. Two seminar and two practicum (field experience) hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 5901. Special Topics. Intensive study of selected topics in occupational therapy. May be repeated for credit. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

OT 5903. Special Topics. Intensive study of selected topics in occupational therapy. May be repeated for credit. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 5911. Independent Study. Advanced work in special fields of occupational therapy. May be repeated for credit. Credit: One hour.

OT 5913. Independent Study. Advanced work in special fields of occupational therapy. May be repeated for credit. Credit: Three hours.

OT 5916. Adaptation to Physical Challenges in Adult Years I. Six-week practicum in health care setting where occupational therapy is provided for adult individuals experiencing physical challenges. Opportunities to evaluate needs then plan and implement programs and services. Prerequisites: Completion of didactic coursework and professional project. Forty practicum hours a week. Credit: Six hours.

OT 5926. Adaptation to Physical Challenges in Adult Years II. Six-week practicum in a health care setting where occupational therapy is provided for adult individuals experiencing physical challenges. Evaluation of needs, delivery of service and exploration of management and administrative issues. Prerequisites: Completion of didactic coursework and professional paper. Forty practicum hours a week. Credit: Six hours.

OT 5932. Rehabilitation Technology in Practice. Properties of materials, specific equipment, and techniques used in occupational therapy with an emphasis on the upper extremity. Uses of rehabilitation technology in everyday life. Practice in the use of prosthetics, splinting, orthotics, pain management, and principles of physical agent modalities. One lecture and three laboratory hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

OT 5936. Adaptation to Psychosocial Challenges Across the Life Span I. Six-week practicum in a health care setting where occupational therapy is provided for individuals experiencing psychosocial challenges. Opportunities to evaluate needs then plan and implement programs and services. Prerequisites: Completion of didactic coursework and professional paper. Forty practicum hours a week. Credit: Six hours.

OT 5946. Adaptation to Psychosocial Challenges Across the Life Span II. Six-week practicum in a health care setting where occupational therapy is provided for individuals experiencing psychosocial challenges. Evaluation of needs, delivery of service, and exploration of management and administrative issues. Prerequisites: Completion of didactic coursework and professional paper. Forty practicum hours a week. Credit: Six hours.

OT 5956. Adaptation to Physical or Psychosocial Challenges in Early Years I. Six-week practicum in a health care setting where occupational therapy is provided for individuals experiencing either psychosocial or physical challenges and who are between the ages of birth and adolescence. Opportunities to evaluate needs then plan and implement programs and services. Prerequisites: Completion of didactic coursework and professional paper. Forty practicum hours a week. Credit: Six hours.

OT 5966. Adaptation to Physical or Psychosocial Challenges in Early Years II. Six-week practicum in a health care setting where occupational therapy is provided for individuals experiencing either psychosocial or physical challenges and who are between the ages of birth and adolescence. Evaluation of needs, delivery of service, and exploration of management and administrative issues. Prerequisites: Completion of didactic coursework and professional paper. Forty practicum hours a week. Credit: Six hours.

OT 5976. Alternative Clinical Experience I. Six-week practicum in a health care setting where occupational therapy is provided for individuals with specific needs and/or the service is delivered in a non-traditional health care environment. Opportunities to evaluate needs then plan and implement programs and services. Prerequisites: Completion of didactic coursework and professional paper. Forty practicum hours a week. Credit: Six hours.

OT 5986. Alternative Clinical Experience II. Six-week practicum in a health care setting where occupational therapy is provided for individuals with specific needs and/or the service is delivered in a non-traditional health care environment. Evaluation of needs, delivery of service, and exploration of management and administrative issues. Prerequisites: Completion of didactic coursework and professional paper. Forty practicum hours a week. Credit: Six hours.

OT 5992. Professional Reasoning Capstone. Complex case studies for integration of skill, performance, and participation in the field of occupational therapy. Inventory and documentation of personal and professional competencies for successful transition to supervised practice. Two seminar hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

OT 6101. Professional Development Core I. Principles of leadership; identification, access, and validation of information sources and professional and scholarly writing. One lecture hours a week. Credit: One hour.

OT 6103. Mentored Professional Development I. Design of a personal and professional development plan in an area of specialization in occupational therapy, under the tutelage of a faculty mentor. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6133. Advanced Evidence-Based Occupational Therapy Practice. Advanced clinical competence and leadership within intervention systems. Critical analysis of occupational therapy assessments, interventions, outcomes and development of guidelines for best practice at the client, program, and systems levels. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6201. Professional Development Core II. Review of applied research designs: peer discussion on applied research designs: critique and feedback on developing and ongoing projects. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

OT 6203. Mentored Professional Development II. Engage in approved professional development plan and, in collaboration with faculty mentor, reflect on and assess progress, revising the plan as needed. Complete proposal of doctoral capstone project for populations served by occupational therapists. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6223. Theory and Knowledge Development in Occupational Therapy. Current theories and relationship to practice. Examination of the evolution and significance of occupation, adaptation, and environment as seminal concepts in the profession's knowledge development. Application to clinical research. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6243. Learning Designs for Occupational Therapy Knowledge. Planning, conducting, and assessing outcomes for teaching programs, professional workshops, and research presentations specific to occupational therapy knowledge and skills. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6253. Scholarly Writing in Occupational Therapy. Development of scholarly writing skills linked to effective research and dissemination competencies. Writing style, organization, logic, clarity of content, and concise, cogent argument. Search techniques, reference management tools, and scholarly ethics. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6301. Professional Development Core III. Strategies for lifelong learning, professional publication, and presentation skills. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

OT 6303. Mentored Professional Development III. Completion of activities indicated in professional development plan, with documentation of progress and reflection upon the process, including completion of doctoral capstone project. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6333. Occupation in Context. Occupational participation at the immediate, proximal, community, and societal scales of environments explored within contexts. Application of ecological and occupational models to evaluation and intervention for case studies and research methods. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6343. Theory of Occupational Adaptation. Examination of the theory of occupational adaptation as a normative model of human growth and development and a system for design of occupation-based practice models based on the interaction between the person, the environment, and internal adaptation. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6353. Neuroscience Applications: Occupational Therapy and Adaptation. Neuroscience foundations of the concepts of occupation and adaptation. Emphasis on current research related to mechanisms of adaptation of the nervous system structures and functions as a result of engagement in occupation. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6363. Statistical Analysis in Occupational Therapy. Examination of quantitative research methods including design, level of measurement, sampling, and validity. Emphasis on computation and analysis of such statistics as applicable to contemporary research in occupational therapy. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6373. Grant Writing in Occupational Therapy. Development of knowledge and skills necessary to write a grant proposal. Consideration of a range of grants/contracts inlcluding private foundation, state contracts, and federal grants. Essential steps to build interdisciplinary partnerships. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6433. Teaching Practicum in Occupational Therapy. Planning, conducting, and evaluating a teaching program which may include an academic course in the undergraduate or professional master's curriculum or a continuing education workshop for occupational therapists or other health professionals. May be repeated for credit. Five practicum hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6553. Applied Research Design and Methods. Relationships between therapy and research; strengths and weaknesses of alternative research designs and traditions for scholarly inquiry; qualitative and quantitative research methods; program evaluation. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6563. Programmatic Research Planning. Participation in existing work of the student's supervising professor which illustrates sequential development of a line of research and which may lead to development of a dissertation topic for the student. May be repeated for credit. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6623. Instrumentation for Measuring Occupational Performance. Current theories and principles of measurement. Relationship of measurement to practice, education, and research. Application of OT knowledge/expertise in development or revision of instruments used across practice contexts. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6643. Advanced Qualitative Methods in Occupational Therapy. Methods of data collection and interpretation including participant observation, qualitative interviews, focus groups, and trustworthiness techniques; emphasis on practical application to research questions and implementation of a research study. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6823. Current Issues and Trends in Occupational Therapy. Influences of changes in the health care delivery system on practice and education in occupational therapy. Analyses of issues and trends in occupational therapy and subsequent approaches taken by the profession to adapt. Role of the occupational therapist as change agent and consultant. Three lecture hours a week. Credit Three hours.

OT 6903. Special Topics. Selected current topics relevant to occupational therapy. May be repeated for credit. Three seminar hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6911. Independent Study. Credit: One hour.

OT 6913. Independent Study. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6983. Dissertation. Prerequisite: Successful completion of qualifying exam. May be repeated for credit. Credit: Three hours.

OT 6993. Dissertation. Prerequisites: OT 6983 and successful defense of dissertation proposal. May be repeated for credit. Credit: Three hours.

Professors

BAXTER, MARY FRANCES, Professor of Occupational Therapy. B.S., Colorado State University; M.A., Texas Woman's University; Ph.D., University of Houston .
BOWYER, PATRICIA L., Professor of Occupational Therapy; Associate Director of the School of Occupational Therapy: Houston. B.A., Milligan College; M.S., Eastern Kentucky University; Ed.D., East Tennessee State University.
CHAN, JOSEPHINE SUK-KUEN, Professor of Occupational Therapy. B.S., Hong Kong Polytechnic University; M.A., Texas Woman's University; Ph.D., University of Houston .
HERSCH, GAYLE I., Professor of Occupational Therapy. B.S., Indiana University-Bloomington; M.S., Indiana University/Purdue University at Indianapolis; Ph.D., Indiana University-Bloomington.
NEVILLE-SMITH, MARSHA A., Professor of Occupational Therapy. B.S., Eastern Michigan University; M.S., University of Texas at Dallas; Ph.D., University of Texas at Dallas.

Associate Professors

AMERIH, HUSNY, Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy. B.S., King Hussein Medical Center, Amman, Jordan; M.S., University of Central Arkansas; Ph.D., Texas Woman's University.
BOWMAN, O. J., Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy. B.S., University of Wisconsin, Madison; M.S., Washington University, St. Louis; Ph.D., Texas A&M University.
CHANG, PEI-FEN J., Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy. B.S., National Taiwan University; M.S., University of Southern California; Ph.D., University of Texas Medical Branch.
EVETTS, CYNTHIA L., Associate Professor, Director of the School of Occupational Therapy. B.S., Texas A&M University; M.O.T., Texas Woman's University; Ph.D., Texas Woman's University.
FLETCHER, TINA S., Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy. B.S., University of Texas Medical Branch; B.F.A., East Texas State University; M.A., University of Alabama; M.F.A., Texas A&M University-Commerce; Ed.D., Texas A&M University-Commerce.
PICKENS, NORALYN D., Associate Professor of Occupational Therapy; Associate Director of the School of Occupational Therapy : Dallas. B.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; M.S., University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Assistant Professors

HAN, AREUM, Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy. B.A., Yonsei University South Korea; M.S., University of Kansas; Ph.D., University of Kansas.
VAS, ASHA K., Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy. B.O.T., Christian Medical College; M.A., St. Catherine University; Ph.D., The University of Texas at Dallas.
WASHINGTON, FERMOND (LEON) F., Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy. B.S. Texas Woman’s University; M.S.W. Our Lady of the Lake University; Ph.D. Texas Woman’s University.

Visiting Assistant Professor

WREN, RENE', Visiting Assistant Professor of Occupational Therapy. B.S., Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center; O.T.D., Chatham University.

Associate Clinical Professors

BROWN, DIANE P., Associate Clinical Professor of Occupational Therapy. B.S., Baylor University; M.O.T., Texas Woman's University; Ph.D., University of North Texas.
BUCKINGHAM, DEBORAH K., Associate Clinical Professor of Occupational Therapy. B.S., Texas Woman's University; M.S., University of North Texas.
FETTE, CLAUDETTE A., Associate Clinical Professor of Occupational Therapy. B.S., Texas Woman's University; M.S., University of North Texas; Ph.D., Texas Woman's University.

Assistant Clinical Professors

HENNIGAN, MARY L., Assistant Clinical Professor of Occupational Therapy. B.A., Dominican University; M.B.A., University of Dallas; M.O.T., Texas Woman's University.
LOHMANN, ALICIA F., Assistant Clinical Professor of Occupational Therapy. B.S., Texas A&M University; M.O.T., Texas Woman's University.
MASON, VICKI C., Assistant Clinical Professor of Occupational Therapy. B.S., Murray State University; M.S., University of St. Francis.
SIT, WILLIAM (YAU CHI BOOGIE), Assistant Clinical Professor of Occupational Therapy. Professional Diploma, Hong Kong Polytechnic; M.A., Texas Woman's University; Ph.D., Texas Woman's University.