Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences

http://www.twu.edu/nutrition-food-sciences/

Chair: K. Shane Broughton, PhD
Location: OMB 307 (Denton)
Phone: 940-898-2636
Fax: 940-898-2634
E-mail: Denton: nutrfdsci@twu.edu

Location: IHSH 7118 (Houston)
Phone: 713-794-2371
Fax: 713-794-2374
E-mail: Houston: nfs-houston@twu.edu

Graduate Degrees Offered


The primary objectives of the graduate programs are to:

  1. provide practice-related experience and transformational learning to advance students’ knowledge and expertise in their field of study;
  2. engage in experiences that contribute to the profession and to society through improved health and wellness; and
  3. assist in the development of future professional leaders.

Depending on the course of study, students are prepared for a variety of professional careers in clinical dietetics, the food industry, health and wellness, sports nutrition, education, or research.

Research interests of the faculty include areas of laboratory and clinical investigation focused on the nutritional sciences, nutrition education, and food sciences. The Nutrition and Food Sciences site references specific faculty research areas.

Please see the Admissions section of this catalog. In addition to these general requirements, the Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences requires the following minimum undergraduate semester credit hours prerequisites for the various majors:

M.S. in Nutrition and Ph.D. in Nutrition

Chemistry (including Organic and Biochemistry)9-12
Human Anatomy and Physiology3-4
Introduction to Nutrition3
Upper Level Nutrition (Advanced Nutrition: Macronutrients and Micronutrients and Nutrition through the Lifecycle)6-9

M.S. in Food Science and Flavor Chemistry and Ph.D. in Nutrition (Flavor Chemistry)

Chemistry9-12
Food Science6-9

M.S. in Food Systems Administration and Ph.D. in Nutrition (Food Systems Administration)

Microbiology4
Introduction to Nutrition3
Accounting3
Quantity Food Production & Service3
Upper Level Foodservice Management and/or Business6

Master’s Admission

For unconditional admission, applicants must present:

  1. Official transcripts that show evidence of prerequisite courses and at least a 3.25 GPA on a 4.0 scale for the last 60 undergraduate semester credit hours and all post-baccalaureate and graduate semester credit hours.

  2. Evidence of completing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE*) with a preferred minimum score of 143 on the verbal portion and 141 on the quantitative portion.

  3. (For M.S. in Food Science and Flavor Chemistry only) A two-page personal statement of interest specific to the area of flavor chemistry.

Applicants who meet the above criteria with exception of GPA may qualify for provisional admission if they have at least a 3.0 GPA (4.0 scale) on the last 60 undergraduate semester credit hours. If the applicant has previously earned graduate credits from TWU or another regionally accredited graduate program, the first 12 credit hours completed will be considered in lieu of the last 60 undergraduate hours.

Applicants who meet all other requirements but lack up to 9 semester credit hours of prerequisite undergraduate courses may be admitted provisionally to a master’s program. They must complete the required prerequisite courses within the first two semesters of graduate work.

*GRE Alternative Scores:
The following scores can be used in place of the GRE score for MS applicants:

  • GMAT: 330 total or verbal score of 21 and quantitative score or 17
  • MCAT: total score of 500-507 (125-126 critical analysis/reading; biological and biochemical foundations of living systems: 125-126)

M.S. in Exercise and Sports Nutrition

For unconditional admission, applicants must present:

  1. A baccalaureate degree in kinesiology or nutrition or its equivalent.
  2. Official transcripts that show evidence of prerequisite undergraduate courses in the areas of exercise physiology, advanced exercise physiology, exercise testing and prescription, human anatomy and physiology, biochemistry, introduction to nutrition, advanced nutrition, and an upper level nutrition course.
  3. At least a 3.25 GPA (4.0 scale) for the last 60 undergraduate semester credit hours.
  4. Evidence of completing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE*) with a preferred minimum score of 153 on the verbal portion and 140 on the quantitative portion.
  5. A 1-2 page statement of intent providing evidence of work and volunteer experience related to intended field of study and goals.
  6. Two letters of recommendation.

Applicants who meet all other requirements but lack up to 12 semester credit hours of prerequisite undergraduate courses may be admitted provisionally to this program. They will complete all 12 semester credit hours during the first two semesters of graduate work.

*GRE Alternative Scores:
The following scores can be used in place of the GRE score for MS applicants:

  • GMAT: 330 total or verbal score of 21 and quantitative score or 17
  • MCAT: total score of 500-507 (125-126 critical analysis/reading; biological and biochemical foundations of living systems: 125-126)

Doctoral Admission

For unconditional admission, applicants must present:

  1. Must have MS degree (or equivalent to US MS degree) and exhibit research experience that is equivalent to a thesis.
  2. Official transcripts that show evidence of prerequisite courses and at least a 3.5 GPA (4.0 scale) for the last 60 semester credit hours.
  3. Evidence of completing the Graduate Record Examination (GRE*) with a preferred minimum score of 153 on the verbal portion and 146 on the quantitative portion.
  4. Two letters of reference.
  5. A statement of purpose (one to pages pages) that includes reasons for undertaking graduate work, explanation of study and research interests, work experience, and professional goals.
  6. CV or resume providing evidence of prior education, work experience, and research experience. Research experience should include any prior presentations or publications to which the applicant made significant contributions as well as any expertise in research techniques.

Applicants who meet the above criteria with exception of GPA may qualify for provisional admission if they have at least a 3.0 GPA (4.0 scale) on the last 60 semester credit hours.

*GRE Alternative Scores:
The following scores can be used in place of the GRE score for MS applicants:

  • GMAT: 430 total or verbal score of 27 and quantitative score or 23
  • MCAT: total score of 500-507 (125-126 critical analysis/reading; biological and biochemical foundations of living systems: 125-126)

The Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, in collaboration with health care facilities in the Houston metroplex and the Dallas/Fort Worth metroplex, offers two Dietetic Internship programs with graduate credit that lead to a master’s degree. These are the TWU Dietetic Internship Program-Denton campus and the TWU Dietetic Internship Program-Houston Center. The Houston campus also offers the academic component for the Combined Dietetic Internship-Master’s Degree Houston Michael E. DeBakey Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center Program.

The TWU Dietetic Internship programs have been granted accreditation status by the:

Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
120 S. Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000
Chicago, IL 60606-6995
312-899-0040

The Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is a specialized accrediting body recognized by the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation and the United States Department of Education.

All TWU Dietetic Internship programs participate in a computer matching process for selection of students. Upon successful completion of the program, students are eligible to write the registration examination by the Commission on Dietetic Registration.

Further information and application forms may be obtained from the program directors or online at the Nutrition and Food Sciences website and submitted before the deadline date (mid-February) as indicated on the application form.

Director, Dietetic Internship
TWU Dietetic Internship Program plus graduate credit
Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences
P.O. Box 425888
Denton, TX 76204-5888
940-898-2636

or

Director, Dietetic Internship
TWU Dietetic Internship Program plus graduate credit
Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences
6700 Fannin St.
Houston, TX 77030-2343
713-794-2371

or

Director, Dietetic Internship
Michael E. DeBakey VA Medical Center
2002 Holcombe Blvd
Houston, TX 77030

Students pursuing a minor in Nutrition and Food Sciences must have the following undergraduate prerequisites, depending on emphasis chosen:

Nutrition

Biochemistry, Human Anatomy and Physiology, Introduction to Nutrition, Advanced Nutrition: Macronutrients and Micronutrients, and Advanced Nutrition Lab, or equivalent

Food Science and Flavor Chemistry

Chemistry (8 semester credit hours) and 6 semester credit hours of food science, food preparation, or equivalent

Food Systems Administration

Microbiology, Quantity Food Production and Service, and 3 additional semester credit hours upper level food service management or business courses

Master’s level

9 graduate semester credit hours in area of emphasis

Doctoral level

12 graduate semester credit hours in area of emphasis

Courses

NFS 5003. Food Chemistry. Chemical properties of food ingredients and food systems, relationship of chemical properties to the functional properties, and their effects on food and nutritional qualities. Prerequisite: Organic chemistry or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5013. Sensory Evaluation of Foods. Introduction to the neuroscience of taste and sensory analysis theory and techniques. Practical tools to select, conduct, and statistically analyze appropriate tests. One lecture and six laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5023. Food Analysis. Objective analysis and evaluation of properties of foods and food systems during processing, development, and storage. Prerequisite: NFS 5003. One lecture and six laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5033. Eating Behaviors and Eating Disorders. Examination of the cultural, societal, and psychological influences on eating behaviors with specific attention to the causes and treatment of various types of eating disorders. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5043. Nutritional Aspects of Vegetarianism. Degrees of vegetarian regimens (e.g. lacto-ovo, vegan); potential health benefits from adopting a vegetarian diet, ensuring nutritional adequacy of vegetarian diets throughout the life cycle; potential nutritional deficiencies arising from the partial or complete avoidance of animal products; current research; recent advances in dietetic practice. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5053. Functional Foods. Exploration of foods capable of providing health benefits beyond basic nutrition with emphasis on improved health and disease prevention benefits of certain whole foods and food products. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5063. Food Toxicology. Principles of toxicology and adverse effects of contaminants in foods of chemical and biological origin on human health; application of principles to food safety. Prerequisites: Food Science, and Human Anatomy and lab course; or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5133. Professional Internship for Exercise and Sports Nutrition. Application of exercise and sports nutrition knowledge in varied practice settings. Student is required to complete 150 clock hours of supervised practice during a minimum of eight weeks (10-19 hours of work a week). Ten practicum hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5173. Professional Practicum. Guided field experience in administrative supervisory, consultant, or similar level positions for a Master's degree in Nutrition. Thirty practicum hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5303. Experimental Food. Application of scientific principles and experimental procedures to food preparation, including food product development studies and projects. Sensory evaluation and laboratory analysis. One lecture and six laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5314. Nutrition and Human Metabolism. Nutritional biochemistry; chemistry, digestion, absorption, transport, regulation, function, and metabolism of nutrients; relationship between dietary intake, intermediary metabolism, and pathogenesis and health. Prerequisites: 6-7 hours upper level undergraduate nutrition courses (advanced nutrition, micro-and-macro-nutrients, nutrition through the lifecycle; or equivalent). Four lecture hours a week. Credit: Four hours.

NFS 5321. Seminar in Food Science. General overview of topics related to food science and technology including a review of current literature. Special emphasis on current areas of research including product development. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 5331. Seminar in Nutrition. Current research in nutrition and nutritional care. One seminar hour a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 5332. Capstone Seminar. Terminal seminar for non-thesis Master's degree in Nutrition. Evaluation and critique of advanced concepts in nutrition and food sciences from current scientific publications. Prerequisite: 27 semester credits hours of graduate degree level coursework. Two seminar hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

NFS 5343. Advanced Nutritional Care. Nutritional care including diet therapy; current research in dietary care; dietary treatment of metabolic diseases. Prerequisite: Nutrition and human metabolism course or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5363. Human Nutrition in Disease. The role of nutrition in the etiology, management, and prevention of acquired diseases including cardiovascular, endocrine, and gastrointestinal diseases, cancer, and urological disorders. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: NFS 5314. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5423. Nutrition and Gerontology. Nutritional status of older adult, normal, and therapeutic nutrition; metabolic pathways of the nutrients, sociological, and physiological factors. Prerequisite: Micronutrients and macronutrients courses. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5443. Nutrition and Women's Health. Relationship between nutrition/nutrients and health issues of women, including Alzheimer's disease, cancer (breast/colon, cervical and ovarian, and lung), diabetes, heart disease, overweight, and obesity; current statistics, etiology, symptoms, treatment, and preventive measures of each health issue. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5453. Nutrition Education. Dissemination of nutritional knowledge to various ethnic and age groups; cultural and environmental factors in dietary planning and selection; practical experiences included. Prerequisites: Micronutrients and macronutrients courses. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5471. Clinical Aspects of Human Nutrition. Application of the principles of biochemistry, physiology, and nutrition in the treatment of human disease. Prerequisite or co-requisite: Admission to the MEDVAMC Dietetic Internship Program. Three practicum hours a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 5472. Clinical Aspects of Human Nutrition. Application of the principles of biochemistry, physiology, and nutrition in the treatment of human disease. Prerequisite or co-requisite: Admission to the MEDVAMC Dietetic Internship Program. Six practicum hours a week. Credit: Two hours.

NFS 5473. Advanced Preventive Nutrition. Types of prevention; evidence for the role of dietary nutrients in preventing major causes of morbidity and mortality (e.g., cardiovascular disease, cancer); national goals for health promotions; dietary guidelines for health promotion and disease prevention; position statements on diet and health. Prerequisite: Introduction to nutrition course or equivalent. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5493. Medical Nutrition Therapy in Pediatrics. Diagnosis, etiology, prevalence, pathophysiology, and nutrition impact of acute and chronic diseases affecting children. Application of principles of medical nutrition therapy to help prevent certain diseases and conditions and provide nutrition care for infants, children, and adolescents with these diseases and conditions. Prerequisite: NFS 5313. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5521. Nutrition for Collegiate and Professional Sports. Application of evidence-based nutrition information in real-life sports settings. Case studies including fueling strategies, weight management, hydration and supplements, training table, traveling, and food challenges with individual athletes. Prerequisites: Nine hours of nutrition courses. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 5543. Nutrition in Pregnancy and Infancy. Understanding of nutrition in cellular growth of the whole body and individual organs; physiological changes during pregnancy; maternal-fetal exchange of nutrients; and the influence of nutrition and its nutrient requirements on pregnancy outcome and on the growth and mental developments of infants. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5583. Nutrition and Exercise. Application of nutrient recommendations to sports and exercise states, differences between scientifically acceptable protocols relating exercise and nutrition and unproven myths using evidence-based analysis process, and biochemistry of exercise. Laboratory projects designed to provide information and dietary intervention programs to individuals or groups interested in sports nutrition. Prerequisites: NFS 5314 and six upper level undergraduate nutrition hours. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5623. Nutraceuticals and Dietary Supplements. A critical evaluation of issues, concepts, and controversies about dietary supplements and nutraceutical ingredients. Emphasis on the importance of scientific investigations to evaluate their efficacy, safety, and value for health promotion, disease prevention, and treatment. Prerequisites or co-requisites: Course in nutrition and human metabolism. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5681. Sports Nutrition Practicum. Field experiences working with athletic teams or individuals at fitness facilities to provide sports nutrition education to maximize training benefits and performance. May be repeated for additional credit. Three practicum hours a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 5693. Nutrition and Metabolic Syndrome. Pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome; metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease; relevance of nutrition in development and treatment of metabolic syndrome. Prerequisite or co-requisite: Course in nutrition and human metabolism. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5713. Human Resource Management in Nutritional Care Systems. Information concerning the functions of personnel management, recruitment, job description construction, benefits and compensation programs, unionization, and proper managerial and legal techniques to resolve conflicts. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5721. Seminar in Food Systems Administration. Recent development in research related to foodservice systems management. One lecture hour a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 5733. Productivity and Quality Improvement for Foodservice Systems. Study of productivity, decision-making, work simplification, and continuous quality improvement for foodservice systems. Group or individual investigations in institutional administration, supervised observations, conferences, and reports. Prerequisite: Six hours of institutional administration. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5743. Cost Analysis for Foodservice Systems. Cost analysis and controls in the management of foodservice systems. Emphasizes quality assurance; food, labor, and energy control; and financial analysis. Utilization of the computer as a management tool. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5753. Foodservice Facility Design and Management. Facility design and management for institutional foodservice operations. Preliminary planning, facility layout, space allocation, utilities, environmental planning, security management, and equipment selections. Prerequisite: Quantity foods lecture and lab. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5763. Food Safety/Foodborne Illness. Study of foodborne illness in relation to food handling practices in foodservice systems and food industry. Hazard Analysis Critical Control methods, risk management, government initiatives, and current search in food safety. Prerequisites: Quantity foods lecture and lab, and microbiology lecture and lab. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5773. Organization and Management for Foodservice Systems. Principles of management as applied to foodservice organizations. Study of interaction of menu planning, purchasing, food production, service and distribution, personnel management, and financial control. Prerequisite: Quantity foods lecture and lab. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5793. Management Information Systems for Food Systems Administration. Management of information technology and systems in foodservice organizations to assist with data management, decision making, marketing, and problem solving. Software for nutrient analysis, food production, presentation, spreadsheet, database management, and web applications. Two lecture and two laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5813. Internship Experience in Nutritional Care. Application of nutritional care skills in the clinical setting. Acceptance to a dietetic internship is required. May be repeated for credit. Twelve practicum hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5833. Principles of Clinical Instruction in Nutritional Care. Experiential development of skills and evaluation techniques for clinical instructors in approved programs. May be repeated for additional credit. Nine clinical hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5893. Advanced Nutritional Epidemiology. Advanced epidemiological concepts; design of observational and interventional studies; estimation of energy and nutrient intakes; biomarkers of nutritional status; ongoing clinical trials; current literature. Prerequisites: Nine hours of nutrition and three hours of graduate statistics. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5901. Special Topics. Lectures or conferences on recent developments in nutrition. May be repeated with change of topic for additional credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Credit: One hour.

NFS 5903. Special Topics. Lectures or conferences on recent developments in nutrition. May be repeated with change of topic for additional credit. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5911. Independent Study. Intensive study of a problem of individual or professional interest in nutrition, food sciences, or institution administration. Credit: One hour.

NFS 5913. Independent Study. Intensive study of a problem of individual or professional interest in nutrition, food sciences, or food systems management. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5923. Research in Food Systems Management. Research in organization and management of quantity foodservice. Group and individual conferences and laboratory hours to be arranged. May be repeated for credit. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5953. Cooperative Education. Cooperative work-study arrangements between the University, business, industry, or selected institutions appropriate to the graduate program. Job assignments are made on the basis of student interests, skills, and degree program. The student will apply the ideas and processes learned in other courses in practical experience under cooperative supervision. Cooperative planning and evaluation are essential elements in the course. Nine practicum hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5961. Research in Nutrition and Food Sciences. Individual research problem in a specific area of food and nutrition. Group and individual conferences. Credit: One hour.

NFS 5963. Research in Nutrition and Food Sciences. Individual research problem in a specific area of food and nutrition. Group and individual conferences. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5973. Professional Paper. Prerequisite: Statistics. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5983. Thesis. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 5993. Thesis. Prerequisite: NFS 5983. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 6003. Food Lipids. Application of basic lipid chemistry principles to analyze properties of food and food system lipids; functional properties of lipids and their effects on food systems. Prerequisite: Course in food chemistry or biochemistry. Three lecture hours a week. Credit Three hours.

NFS 6113. Nutrition and Cancer. Overview of nutrition and cancer at the population, cellular, and molecular levels; roles of nutrients and non-nutrients in cancer prevention. Prerequisite: Nutrition and human metabolism course or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 6123. Micronutrients in Human Nutrition. Metabolic functions, metabolism, interrelationships, possible toxicity, and bioavailability of the vitamins and minerals based on current literature and research. Prerequisite: Nutrition and human metabolism course. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 6124. Macronutrients in Human Nutrition. Fundamental roles and energy transformation of carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins in human nutrition. Emphasis on function, metabolism, and interrelationships of the macronutrients based on current literature and research. Prerequisite: Nutrition and human metabolism course. Four lecture hours a week. Credit: Four hours.

NFS 6133. Drug and Nutrient Interactions. Effects of drugs on absorption and metabolism of nutrients, role of nutrients in drug detoxification; use of nutrients as drugs; toxic megadoses of vitamins; combination of drugs and diet in the treatment of disease; effect of nutritional status on drug and nutrient binding. Prerequisite: Nutrition and human metabolism course or permission of the instructor. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 6163. Nutritional Aspects of Obesity. Role of nutritional factors and their interplay with biochemical, physiological, genetic, and psychosocial factors in the etiology of obesity. Adverse health consequences of obesity. The role of nutrition intervention, exercise, pharmacological treatment, and surgical intervention and their nutritional sequelae. Prerequisite: Nutrition and human metabolism course. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 6173. Professional Practicum. Guided field experience in administrative supervisory, consultant, or similar level positions. Field experiences may not be part of the student's regular job responsibilities. May be repeated for three additional hours. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 6203. Advanced Research Techniques. Select laboratory techniques in separation and measurements of proteins (ELISA, Western Blot gel chromatography), cell culture techniques; cell separation and culture. One lecture hour and six laboratory hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 6233. Postharvest Physiology. Postharvest physiology for horticulture and agronomy of fruits and vegetables and other plants consumed for food; the cellular and subcellular structure of harvested products continuing through metabolic alterations and changes in biochemical constituents after harvest; environmental factors that cause stress after harvest; the principles of ripening gases and other treatments including modified atmosphere packaging. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 6331. Advanced Seminar in Nutrition. This course will accommodate both doctoral and master's students with more emphasis on current topics in ever changing nutrition research. Seminars designed to cover state of the are overview of current and emerging topics will be presented by invited outside guest speakers, TWU faculty, and graduate students. One seminar hour a week. Credit: One hour.

NFS 6903. Special Topics. Specially scheduled course on topic of current interest. May be repeated for additional credit when topic varies. Three lecture hours a week. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 6911. Independent Study. Intensive study of a problem of individual or professional interest in nutrition, food sciences, or food systems management. Credit: One hour.

NFS 6913. Independent Study. Intensive study of a problem of individual or professional interest in nutrition, food sciences, or food systems management. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 6921. Advanced Research in Nutrition and Food Science. Individual research problem in a specific area of food and nutrition. Group and individual conferences. May be repeated for credit. Credit: One hour.

NFS 6923. Advanced Research in Nutrition and Food Science. Individual research problem in a specific area of food and nutrition. Group and individual conferences. May be repeated for credit. Credit: Three hour.

NFS 6931. Advanced Research in Nutrition. Research problems in radiographic bone densitometry, metabolic balance studies; nutritional status of children and of older persons. Group and individual conferences and laboratory hours to be arranged. Credit: One hour.

NFS 6933. Advanced Research in Nutrition. Research problems in radiographic bone densitometry, metabolic balance studies; nutritional status of children and of older persons. Group and individual conferences and laboratory hours to be arranged. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 6941. Advanced Research in Food Science. Selection and study of individual research problems in a selected specific area of foods; objective and subjective methods of product evaluation. Credit: One hour.

NFS 6943. Advanced Research in Food Science. Selection and study of individual research problems in a selected specific area of foods; objective and subjective methods of product evaluation. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 6983. Dissertation. Credit: Three hours.

NFS 6993. Dissertation. Prerequisite: NFS 6983. Credit: Three hours.

Professors

BROUGHTON, KENNETH Shane, Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences; Chair of the Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., Colorado State University; M.S., Washington State University; Ph.D., Washington State University.
IMRHAN, VICTORINE, Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., Texas Tech University; M.S., Louisiana Tech University; Ph.D., Texas Woman's University.
PRASAD, CHANDAN, Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology : Naini Tal, India; M.Sc., G.B. Pant University of Agriculture and Technology : Naini Tal, India; Ph.D., Louisiana State University .
VIJAYAGOPAL, PARAKAT, Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., University of Kerala; M.S., Banaras Hindu University; Ph.D., University of Kerala.

Associate Professors

JUMA, SHANIL, Associate Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., Purdue University; M.S., University of Illinois, Chicago; Ph.D., Oklahoma State University.
MOORE, CAROLYN E., Associate Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., University of California, Berkeley; M.S., University of California, Berkeley; M.B.A., Rice University; Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles.
WARREN, CYNTHIA A., Associate Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., Texas A&M University; M.S., Texas A&M University; Ph.D., Texas A&M University .

Assistant Professors

DAVIS, KATHLEEN, Assistant Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., Texas Woman's University; M.S., Texas Woman's University; Ph.D.., Texas Woman's University.
DU, XIAOFEN, Assistant Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., Huazhong Agricultural University; M.S., Huazhong Agricultural University; Ph.D., Oregon State Universtiy.
EVERTS, HELEN B., Assistant Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., The Pennsylvania State University, M.S., The University of Georgia; Ph.D., The University of Georgia.
LEMIEUX, MONIQUE J., Assistant Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., Christopher Newport University; M.S., The University of Tennessee Knoxville; Ph.D., Texas Tech University.
PATTERSON, MINDY, Assistant Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., Texas A&M University; M.S., University of Alabama, Birmingham; Ph.D., Texas Woman's University.

Associate Clinical Professors

MORELAND, KAREN A., Associate Clinical Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., Southwest Texas State University; M.S., Texas Woman's University.
REW, MARTHA L., Associate Clinical Professor of Nutrition and Food Sciences. B.S., University of Southwestern Louisiana; M.S., Louisiana State University .